Monday, June 04, 2012

Patrick Cockburn : Why War is Marching on the Road to Damascus

Obama, Clinton, Panetta, CIA calling the tune to this march

The Independent
By Patrick Cockburn
06/03/2012

Damascus feels like a city expecting the worst to happen and seeing no way to avoid it. War is spreading across the country and is unlikely to spare the capital. Rebels speak of stepping up attacks in the city and could easily do so in the next few weeks.


Worse than useless:  Obama/NATO apologist, puppet Maj. Gen. Mood
I spent the last week in Damascus and the atmosphere reminds me of Beirut in 1975 at the start of the 15-year civil war. Again and again in conversations, people realistically laid out for me the nasty things that are all too likely to happen, but few were able to produce plausible ideas on how disaster might be averted.

"I wish people abroad would stop talking about a civil war starting here because it is still the people against the government," said one committed member of the opposition as we sat in a café in Damascus (everybody I spoke to has to be nameless, for obvious reasons). She believed that it was only the heavy presence of the security forces that were suppressing mass popular protest in the days after the Houla massacre.


After being bound, Houla children then shot in the head

She may have been right, but in practice not a lot was happening. There was less traffic on the streets and foreign TV stations made much play of YouTube postings showing merchants shutting their shops in protest at the Houla slaughter. But, driving around Damascus, the strike's success was difficult to judge since so many shops and restaurants are shut anyway because of the lack of tourists and the impact of sanctions.


The rebels could probably start a campaign of bombings and selective assassinations fairly easily in Damascus. This is not a sign that they are militarily strong, but it would be easy for a movement lacking arms and experienced fighters to spread instability by these means. The rebels can do this using as bases strongholds in and around the city such as Douma, which they more or less control.

None of this is good news for the people of Damascus since government retaliation and collective punishments are likely to be savage and sustained. It is depressing that Damascus, one of the more beautiful cities in the world, is on the edge of becoming the victim of the same sort of hatred, fear and destruction that have convulsed Beirut, Baghdad and Belfast over the past 50 years.


Houla massacre victims
 Sectarianism is deepening. Christians are fearful and are all too aware of what happened to their co-religionists in Iraq after 2003. Opposition members in Damascus often blandly blame the rise in sectarian fears on the authorities. "The government is just trying to frighten people," said one Christian human rights activist. "People here have never had a problem with each other." He pointed out that the French had tried to secure their imperial rule by exploiting communal and religious differences, but they had failed.

Unfortunately for Syria, the activist had got his history wrong. In 1860 Muslim mobs burst into the Christian quarter of Damascus and slaughtered between 5,000 and 10,000 people (the Ottoman authorities restored order – a hint here, perhaps, on how other governments might deter official connivance in sectarian murder – by hanging their own governor and 56 of his officials for dereliction of duty and shooting a hundred of their soldiers who had taken part in the massacre).

The present Syrian government may be trying to stir up sectarian strife in order to ensure that the minorities – Alawite, Christian, Druze and Kurd – remain on its side. But it did not invent these communal differences, though the opposition has been trying to play them down. I asked one diplomat long resident in Damascus what he thought of the picture of the Syrian crisis presented to the outside world by YouTube pictures posted by the opposition. "They are deceptive," he answered dryly. "For instance, when they show anti-government demonstrations, the activists always edit out the bit where the crowd shouts 'death to the Alawites!'"

The government probably does have a core constituency that will fight to the death. How big it is, nobody knows. One opposition militant, released from jail last year, believed the majority of Syrians are prepared to pay any price to overthrow the regime. "People want their freedom even if there is an earthquake," he said. "Things will get worse, but the struggle will not be long, and Assad will go." He denied that the opposition wanted revenge, saying "I was in Hama in 1982 when the government killed 40,000 people [the usual figure given is 10,000] over 27 days, but nobody is looking for revenge today."

Sincere though my friend in Damascus was about the government's lack of support – "five per cent of Syrians fight for the regime and 10 per cent support them" – he appeared consumed by bitterness and rage about the treatment of himself and his family, who between them have spent 65 years in jail. It was difficult to believe that the regime's past crimes would be as easily forgiven as he claimed.

At the heart of the Syrian crisis is a revolution against the police state run by the Assad family for 40 years. But there are two parallel struggles going on that taint and complicate this popular uprising. One is the struggle of the Sunni Arab powers, led by Saudi Arabia and Qatar, against the Shia. The other is the US and Saudi-led confrontation with Iran, whose most important ally in the Arab world is Syria. Weapons from Saudi Arabia are now reported to be reaching the insurgents. Iraqi officials say that al-Qa'ida fighters in Diyala province north-east of Baghdad, notorious for massacring Shia villagers and travellers, have headed back to Syria.

Understandable self-deception by activists in Damascus is matched by less justifiable self-deception outside the country. Recent suggestions, such as the establishment of a humanitarian "safe haven" on the Syrian side of the Turkish border, are a recipe for war (and will terrify Armenians in Aleppo and Kurds in Qamishli, both communities having dark memories of Turkish rule). Alternatively, pumping in weapons paid for by the Saudi absolute monarchy whose motives are primarily sectarian and anti-Iranian, will only exacerbate the violence.

President Bashar al-Assad will not go quietly and believes he does not have to go at all. Here lies the problem at the heart of the Syrian crisis, where Russia has some right on its side and President Putin's critics are mistaken. Mr Assad's regime is being asked to reform itself and, at the same time, to drop dead politically and pass out of existence. These aims are contradictory. Why should the Syrian government modify its behaviour if the true purpose of international pressure is regime change?

Regimes changed in Iraq and Libya because they were defeated in war by the Western powers (the Libyan rebels would not have lasted a week without Nato support).

If the Western powers are not going to go to war in Syria, and can't get the Turks to do their dirty work for them, then they should push for reform and power-sharing that leaves a modified version of the Assad regime in place. This would be difficult for the Russians to oppose and would relieve the fears of Iran. The alternative may be a long war that will tear Syria apart.

Kofi Annan's Warning

Syria is moving perilously close to "all-out war", with its conflict at risk of spilling over into other countries, the UN peace envoy Kofi Annan warned yesterday.


Set up by Obama, NATO and doomed to fail:  Elitist Kofi Annan and his ludicrous "peace" plan

Mr Annan's chilling prediction came on the same day security officials reported that gun battles between pro- and anti-Assad groups in northern Lebanon had killed at least seven and wounded 22. In Syria itself, two civilians were killed – one during an army raid in Damascus, another by gunfire in Homs.

Speaking to Arab League members yesterday, Mr Annan said: "The spectre of all-out civil war, with a worrying sectarian dimension, grows by the day." The UN envoy further stressed that it was vital "to keep our goals firmly in view: stopping the killing, helping the suffering population, securing a political transition – and, I would add, ensuring that the crisis does not spread to the neighbours".

He said that the massacre at Houla, in which 108 people were killed, was appalling. The killings, believed by UN monitors to have been the work pro-Assad militias and soldiers, caused worldwide outrage last weekend.

Mr Annan criticised President Assad for failing to comply with a peace plan. Qatar urged the UN to set a deadline for the plan, saying there should be no more "stalling". Russia also came under fire from Syrian opposition groups, who said it was becoming part of the problem by supporting President Assad.


 
Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.



 

Assad Blames Terrorists (CIA), Outside Forces for Syrian Conflict

For once scumbag dictator Assad is right

Agence France Presse via Deutsche Welle
 06/03/2012

Syria's president has used a televised speech to tell the nation just who was responsible for the bloodshed in the country. Bashar al-Assad said 'terrorists' and 'outside forces' were to blame.


Tough guy Hag Clinton, Obama regime have declared war on Assad
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Sunday blamed "terrorists" and "outside forces" for the ongoing bloodshed in the country.

"The masks have fallen and the international role in the Syrian events is now obvious," Assad said told the country's parliament in a speech that was broadcast live on national television.

He also said that last month's parliamentary elections were the correct response "to the criminal killers and those who finance them." Pointing to those polls, he rejected the idea that the real problem in the country had to do with politics.

"We are not facing a political problem because if we were, this [opposition] party would put forth a political program. What we are facing is [an attempt] to sow sectarian strife and the tool of this is terrorism," Assad said. He also pledged to continue the fight against "armed terrorists."

The president said his government remained open to dialogue with those who sought political reforms, but only under certain conditions.


Assad has survived U.S., NATO attempt to depose him with assistance from Russia, China

"Doors are open and we are ready to start a dialogue, but not with those connected to foreign powers … There is [a] part of [the] opposition that still waits for signals from the outside," he said.

New Diplomatic Urgency

Diplomatic efforts to end the fighting in Syria have been stepped up since the massacre at Houla nine days ago, which killed more than 100 people, including many civilians, and wounded hundreds of others. An investigation conducted by United Nations monitors in the country found the pro-regime forces were likely responsible for at least some of the killings.

In his speech to parliament, Assad denied any responsibility.

"What happened in Houla and elsewhere are brutal massacres which even monsters would not have carried out," Assad said.

On Saturday, the UN-Arab league peace envoy, Kofi Annan, singled out President Assad as the key to resolving the conflict. At an Arab League meeting in Doha, Annan warned that Syria may be slipping into an all-out war.

A cease-fire, which is part of Annan's six-point plan to bring peace to the country, came into force on April 12. However, neither that nor the deployment of nearly 300 UN monitors has stopped the fighting.

The UN estimates that more than 9,000 people have been killed since early last year when the Assad regime launched a crackdown on protesters calling for political reforms.



Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.






Spain Dreads Return of the 'Years of Hunger'

There is a lot more at stake in Spain than mere hunger:  Spanish people now paying for joining bogus EU, thievery of bank criminals, EU dictators

The Independent
By Alasdair Fotheringham
 06/03/2012

As unemployment rises and food queues grow ever longer, it's reminiscent of the 1950's

Two days ago, the main cartoon in the Spanish daily El Pais showed two people staring at a sun which has just one beam left, the punchline being: "Remember when it had a full set?" It is indeed growing increasingly hard to remember such a time in the land of desperation formerly known as Spain. 
 
A taste of what is to come:  Spanish pigs kicking ass on protesters
"Photos for weddings? Down 50 per cent. Christenings? Down 30 per cent," Karlis Mendrano, a long-standing professional photographer in his fifties from San Sebastian, told me. "Ever since the bank cut off the credit, people marry far less, and they want less when they do. I can't put up my prices, so I give them cheaper quality. It's never been so bad."

Chari Peinado, an experienced waitress in an Irish bar in southern Spain, said: "There are periods, like yesterday lunchtime, when it all just shuts down and there's literally nobody. It's eerie. Really bad." And Julio Alvarez, a financial consultant, said: "If things go on like this we are heading towards the abyss" – as if that were the most normal thing in the world. He added: "Most people don't have a clue what an international bailout really is. They just know we're up the creek."
 
Emulating their American cousins, coward Spanish pigs target innocent protesters

Paradoxically, given that some of the grimmest effects of the crisis can strike anywhere, from Bilbao to the Balearics, it is not always that simple to pinpoint a particular area as recession-struck: it could happen anywhere, on a street near you.

Some effects, though, are unavoidable: every day in the past 12 months that I've walked past a queue outside a food kitchen run by monks near the Puerta del Sol square in central Madrid, the line has invariably stretched round the length of the office block. And, if the three unemployed on hunger strike in a church building in Granada are not on public view, the evicted couple and their two daughters, aged 11 and three, who lived in a Kia car on a vacant parking lot near the same city for two freezing winter months, most definitely were. (The day after the story about the couple in the car was run in the local press, they were offered a job and a house free of charge.)
 


Beggars appear to be changing as a result of the recession. Rather than 10 years ago, when many had thick foreign accents, the cards asking for money are now written in fluent Spanish. Thanks to the clouds of tourists who still flock to Spain, city centres are perhaps the least different, even if "menus anti-crisis" in popular restaurants, cheap three-course deals for slimmer wallets, are now so common they are no longer eye-catching. More visible, though, are the fluorescent-jacketed touts who now roam the streets offering to buy jewels and gold, no questions asked. Ten years ago they were non-existent; now, sadly, they are as common a sight as pigeons in Trafalgar Square.

Not everybody is doing so badly. Mercadona, a supermarket chain comparable to Sainsbury's, opened 20 new stores in Navarre recently, and its rival Eroski plans to open 60 across Spain in 2012. The country's arms industry is relatively small but is booming (sales doubled in 2011, albeit only in exports), and it seems as if on every street corner there is a new todo a cien – Spain's equivalent of Poundland – or fast-food outlet.
 


"The scrapyards are making a fortune," adds David Barrales, a car mechanic with his own repair business. "More and more people come to me with used car parts they've bought from write-offs as replacements. Or they'll simply use a bit of wood to keep the window up on a car to save buying a motor."

Not that there are so many cars on the roads these days. "It used to take me 45 minutes or more to get to the local hospital each morning. Now it'll take me 30," Francisco Benitez, a taxi driver of 30 years' standing, told me. "People can't afford the petrol any more. It's as busy as it used to be only when it rains."
 


Cash payments, once standard in Spain for everything but which all but disappeared in the boom years, are becoming more and more normal again. Just one example: the fuel company that comes to refill the oil tank in my property will no longer take credit cards; according to the lorry driver, they've had too many defaults on the payments.
 
The future of Spain if it remains in the EU

The lifeboats for Spain's sinking ship of an economy are filling steadily. In 2008, only Bulgaria, Hungary and Turkey had lower levels of English speakers and only 4 per cent of Spaniards said they were learning the language. These days, though, Spaniards are sitting exams in English – effectively, cast-iron proof of knowledge of foreign languages – in record numbers. "Numbers have gone through the roof," said Joanne Lehmann, an English-language school director and teacher in inland Spain for the past 27 years. "We can't deal with all the inquiries. I've never known anything like it. In October 2011 when terms started, we had a 50 per cent increase in adult learners, a 40 per cent increase in people sitting exams. It's up to 2,800 now. Even people who aren't ready want to take them." She has, she says, 50 engineering students, all of them recently graduated, on her books; none of them has a job.

Marisa Arranz, unemployed for nearly five years, said: "This country has been drained of so much. What do they want to take from us next? Kidneys? Lungs? Limbs?" Ms Arranz still has her home, but others are not so fortunate. According to protest groups, about 200 Spanish families are evicted daily from their houses because they can no longer afford the mortgage – total default payments in Spain currently stand at €143bn, their highest in nearly 20 years.

For anybody aged 70 or over in Spain – those who remember the "Years of Hunger" in the 1940s and 1950s, when Spain suffered its worst recession of the last century and the American embassy recorded levels of infant mortality of 50 per cent in Madrid's suburbs – there are enough echoes of that time for them not to wish to be caught out again.

Federico Bahamontes, a sprightly 83-year-old who was Spain's first winner of the Tour de France, is one such case. Every weekend Mr Bahamontes – who started out working on a fruit and veg stall – goes out to his semi-clandestine allotment outside Toledo, where he tends vegetables and has a "good well of water". He is extremely cagey about its precise location, though.

"Why do you think I've got it?" he asked. "It's for if there's a next time like the 1950s again. This is child's play in comparison to back then." Perhaps. But the plea in Friday's El Pais – "let's not go back to the 1950s" – is hardly an encouraging sign either.



Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.


Iran, U.S., and Complexities of God and Science

Long past time to bury hostage taking in Tehran, get on with business of halting U.S., Israel insane march into WWIII

World News
By Dallas Darling
06/03/2012

When Iranian President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, said that atomic and nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction were incompatible with the teachings of Prophet Mohammad and the Islamic faith, it brought back apprehensive memories of the failed American rescue mission back in 1980, and the death of Iran's first Supreme Religious Leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini on June 3, 1989. Both events signify, a long, arduous, and sometimes conflictive relationship, between the United States and Iran. They are also symbolic of the tension that exists between two republics, one extremely secular and technocratic, the other exceptionally religious and faith-oriented, even believing in God, prophet succession, a super-natural world, and a judgment day.


Khomeini and Arafat playing kissy-face
"It was my decision," said President Jimmy Carter, in a televised broadcast to the American people, "to attempt to rescue the hostages...I am responsible for canceling the mission when technological problems developed." President Carter had just been notified that the enormously complex mission to rescue 52 American hostages had failed, and that several servicemen had been killed. Months earlier, American embassy staff and Marines were taken captive by Iranian Islamic students and held in lieu of over $5 billion in frozen assets. The students, along with many people in Iran, were also seeking the return of the U.S.-backed Shah to be tried for disappearances, torture, and murderous crimes against thousands of Iranian civilians, mainly political opponents and religious reformers.


With the advent of and using the Iran hostage "crisis," Khomeini deposed former President Jimmy Carter, installing Ronald Regan in the White House to begin the systematic destruction of the American people and altering history

Before his death, Ayatollah Khomeini, said, "Who was it that brought down Carter's helicopters...was it us? It was God's work! God humiliated America." Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution had been led by Ayatollah Khomeini, thousands of Islamic religious leaders, and millions of Muslims. He always believed the success of Iran's Islamic Revolution, one that put an end to the U.S.-backed Shah's corrupt regime and dictatorial practices, was due to God. He also questioned technological superiority of the U.S. while it dominated Iran. He once proclaimed: "Let them go all the way to Mars or beyond the Milky Way; they will still be deprived of true happiness...for the solution of social problems and the relief of human misery require foundations in faith and morals."



Carter blew hostage rescue mission
America's failed rescue attempt was a two-night operation that depended on questionable sources. Temporary airstrips were to be used across Iran and its deserts and in and around Tehran, Iran's capital. Numerous transport aircrafts were used, like the MC-130E Combat Talon I, three EC-130E Hercules equipped with a pair of collapsible bladders containing 6,000 gallons of jet fuel, eight Navy RH-53D Sea Stallion minesweeper helicopters. They were flown off the USS Nimitz and USS Coral Sea-billion-dollar state of the art aircraft carriers-in the nearby Indian Ocean. Once the hostages were rescued, a Carrier Air Wing would provide support. Powdery sand and sandstorms caused damage to several aircraft. Two others collided and caught fire, burning to death several U.S. service men.(1)

Initially, religions were usually simple and uncomplicated. Many faiths have modest beginnings and messages, such as loving and forgiving each other and trying to be obedient to God and his purposes. But they soon become doctrinally and theologically multifaceted, filled with hierarchical leaders, numerous laws, and doctrinal debates causing deep divisions. The Prophet Mohammad exemplifies the Qur'an and Sunna-his example. Upon entering the Meccan Ka'aba, he forgave his accusers and those who had killed members of the newly formed Muslim community. Religious duties consisted of faith in Allah, prayer, taking care of the poor and oppressed, fasting, and a pilgrimage. His life revealed "submission to the will of God," (which is what Muslim means).



Arafat died a slow, agonizing death, some say from AIDS
Until the Scientific Revolution, which was heavily influenced by the Industrial and Enlightenment Revolutions, sciences and technologies were somewhat simple and uncomplicated too. The guiding principles of the Scientific Revolution, made possible by Islam's House of Wisdom-where insights in technologies, medicines, sciences, and mathematics revolutionized the world-were overly modest. Francis Bacon believed new technologies and sciences would improve people's lives, and that new medicines and chemistries would be used for healing purposes. Like Edward Jenner, who discovered that inoculation with germs could protect humans from deadly diseases, many believed technological instruments and scientific discoveries could someday eradicate sicknesses.

What, then, has happened in more recent and modern times that has caused an escalation in conflict between sacred and secular Governments, between Mosque/Church and State, and between pro-God/faith nations and pro-sciences/technologies nations? While Europeans and Americans started to view themselves as extensions of their technological devices and machines, minus a soul and spirit and even God, the Islamic world was invaded by numerous and dominant empires that destroyed many Muslim cities, including libraries, universities, and research centers that excelled in sciences and technologies. From a moral perspective, Islamic religious leaders and intellectuals often associated Western militancy and imperialism with railroads, steamships, and telephones.



FATAH

Therefore, over the centuries some Islamic nations and societies have been more cautious with Western-oriented sciences and technologies, especially in regards to advanced weaponry systems of mass destruction, like the ones used to obliterate Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Islamic societies also guard against usury and profit motives, unlike Western corporations that are based on making capital, or selling mass produced goods for more wealth. Global and regional needs between Islamic and Western technological-oriented nations are also different. Muslim communities have had to stress agriculture-due to vast deserts, and the study of water resources-due to its scarcity. Because of an emphasis on the Islamic faith, theological research has often been emphasized more than sciences.

Still, many Muslim scholars and religious leaders do not recognize a problem between mastering or mixing theological concepts with sciences and technologies. Instead, they have had to spend enormous sums of money, and use their human ingenuity and resources, to defend their Islamic societies from Western imperialism, exploitation, and militancy. In declaring that harnessing atomic particles for the purpose of developing destructive weapons is an abomination, both Iran's Supreme Religious Leader and President is following a long and cautious tradition, one that guards against the dangers of destructive and warlike weapons that can often shape, even reflect, the very societies in which they were created in.

Short-sighted use of what appears to be progressive and advanced sciences and technologies can often backfire. Conduct and morals are often forced to change, sometimes in negative and harmful ways. A nation with a massive nuclear arsenal, like the U.S., is not only a threat to the rest of the world, but environmental degradation and alienation become realities. Meanwhile, the threat of nuclear annihilation is always a possibility. Shared powers and balanced relations among nations are transformed too, usually causing the nation with advanced weapons sciences and technologies to become belligerent, the other defensive. Once technologies become well established, they are normalized and become givens. Ethics, along with other things, lag far behind.

Even the habits, thoughts, and values of a nation are changed by new sciences and technologies, sometimes to its own detriment. Faith in superior and destructive weapons technologies can impair rational thinking and distort judgments, as was proven in the case of America's preemptive wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, wars that have caused immense human suffering and misery. After proclaiming that "the solution of social problems and the relief of human misery require foundations in faith and morals," Ayatollah Khomeini went on to say that "merely acquiring material power and wealth, conquering nature and space, have no effect in this regard." To a certain extent, this precept has guided Iran's theo-democracy and religious-oriented foreign policy.

Scientific and technological complexities, along with nuclear armaments and other weapons of mass destruction, will more than likely continue to plague, even determine, the U.S. and its fate. And what of Iran's theological and religious complexities and its destiny? Perhaps only God knows.

Dallas Darling (darling@wn.com)

(1) Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. See the article: "Operation Eagle Claw."


Dallas Darling is the author of Politics 501: An A-Z Reading on Conscientious Political Thought and Action, Some Nations Above God: 52 Weekly Reflections On Modern-Day Imperialism, Militarism, And Consumerism in the Context of John's Apocalyptic Vision, and The Other Side Of Christianity: Reflections on Faith, Politics, Spirituality, History, and Peace. He is a correspondent for www.worldnews.com. You can read more of Dallas' writings at www.beverlydarling.com and wn.com//dallasdarling.



Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.







-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ANDREW KREIG: EXPERTS REJECT FIRE AS CAUSE FOR 9/11 WTC COLLAPSES

The real truth on 9/11 slowly continues to bleed out

 photo
Technical experts are mounting major challenges to official U.S. government accounts of how three World Trade Center skyscrapers collapsed in near-freefall after the 9/11 attacks 15 years ago.

Many researchers are focusing especially on the little-known collapse of

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Geopolitics Of The United States, Part 1: The Inevitable Empire

The Empire and the inevitable fall of the Obama criminal regime

 photo
STRATFOR Editor’s Note: This installment on the United States, presented in two parts, is the 16th in a series of STRATFOR monographs on the geopolitics of countries influential in world affairs.

Like nearly all of the peoples of North and South America, most Americans are not originally from the territory that became the United States.

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Geopolitics Of The United States Part 2: American Identity And The Threats of Tomorrow

A look back at 2011 predictions for the future in order to put events of today into perspective

 photo capitalism_zpsah78uy5p.jpg
We have already discussed in the first part of this analysis how the American geography dooms whoever controls the territory to being a global power, but there are a number of other outcomes that shape what that power will be like. The first and most critical is the impact of that geography on the American mindset.

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


By Robert S. Finnegan

This e-mail outlines and confirms the acts of espionage against Indonesia and Indonesians by Akiko Makino and the others involved both in Kobe University and in AI Lab at University of Airlangga, Surabaya; Bahasa Indonesia original follows English translation...

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UPDATED 01/07/2015 : New Analysis Challenges Tamiflu Efficacy; Hong Kong Corona Virus Outbreak

UPDATED 01/07/2015 : FOX NEWS CORPORATE PHARMA SHILL MEGAN KELLY AND FOX NEWS QUACK DOCTOR NOW PUSHING TAMIFLU FOR PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN;

 photo TAMIFLU_small_zpssojx6okt.jpg
THE 5TH ESTATE UNEQUIVOCALLY WARNS THE PUBLIC NOT TO TAKE OR GIVE THIS PROVEN DANGEROUS, INEFFECTIVE DRUG TO ANYONE

Obama criminals now resulting to biowarfare in quest to destroy Chinese and ASEAN economy; "novel virus substrain" points directly to a Kawaoka / Fouchier / Ernala-Ginting Kobe lab virus weaponized and genetically altered to specifically target and infect the Asian population: Ribavirin...

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 photo WHO02_zpsplmhtlpr.jpg
The 5th Estate has just purchased a library on H5N1 "Novel" virus pandemics, there are dozens of PDF and Exel documents we feel will assist you in saving lives following intentional releases of the H5N1 and now MERS viruses; we will begin by printing those that appear to be extremely relevant here: H5N1 Kobe-Kawaoka-Ernala series continues soon with more "Smoking Gun" e-mails from Teridah Ernala to The 5th Estate . . .

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


By Robert S. Finnegan

On October 12, 2002 the Indonesian island of Bali experienced a terrorist attack that rocked the world. It was unquestionably well-coordinated and executed, the largest in the country's history.

READ MORE >>