Friday, May 11, 2012

Oil Wars on the Horizon

Oil producers like BP scrambling as free oil supplies (plus bribes) give way to nations nationalizing their wells for betterment of their own countries

Counterpunch
By MICHAEL T. KLARE
05/10/2012

Six Recent Clashes and Conflicts on a Planet Heading Into Energy Overdrive 

Conflict and intrigue over valuable energy supplies have been features of the international landscape for a long time. Major wars over oil have been fought every decade or so since World War I, and smaller engagements have erupted every few years; a flare-up or two in 2012, then, would be part of the normal scheme of things. Instead, what we are now seeing is a whole cluster of oil-related clashes stretching across the globe, involving a dozen or so countries, with more popping up all the time. Consider these flash-points as signals that we are entering an era of intensified conflict over energy. 


As the world burns and drowns - in oil
From the Atlantic to the Pacific, Argentina to the Philippines, here are the six areas of conflict — all tied to energy supplies — that have made news in just the first few months of 2012:

* A brewing war between Sudan and South Sudan: On April 10th, forces from the newly independent state of South Sudan occupied the oil center of Heglig, a town granted to Sudan as part of a peace settlement that allowed the southerners to secede in 2011. The northerners, based in Khartoum, then mobilized their own forces and drove the South Sudanese out of Heglig. Fighting has since erupted all along the contested border between the two countries, accompanied by air strikes on towns in South Sudan. Although the fighting has not yet reached the level of a full-scale war, international efforts to negotiate a cease-fire and a peaceful resolution to the dispute have yet to meet with success.

This conflict is being fueled by many factors, including economic disparities between the two Sudans and an abiding animosity between the southerners (who are mostly black Africans and Christians or animists) and the northerners (mostly Arabs and Muslims). But oil — and the revenues produced by oil — remains at the heart of the matter. When Sudan was divided in 2011, the most prolific oil fields wound up in the south, while the only pipeline capable of transporting the south’s oil to international markets (and thus generating revenue) remained in the hands of the northerners. They have been demanding exceptionally high “transit fees” — $32-$36 per barrel compared to the common rate of $1 per barrel — for the privilege of bringing the South’s oil to market. When the southerners refused to accept such rates, the northerners confiscated money they had already collected from the south’s oil exports, its only significant source of funds. In response, the southerners stopped producing oil altogether and, it appears, launched their military action against the north. The situation remains explosive.

* Naval clash in the South China Sea: On April 7th, a Philippine naval warship, the 378-foot Gregorio del Pilar, arrived at Scarborough Shoal, a small island in the South China Sea, and detained eight Chinese fishing boats anchored there, accusing them of illegal fishing activities in Filipino sovereign waters. China promptly sent two naval vessels of its own to the area, claiming that the Gregorio del Pilar was harassing Chinese ships in Chinese, not Filipino waters. The fishing boats were eventually allowed to depart without further incident and tensions have eased somewhat. However, neither side has displayed any inclination to surrender its claim to the island, and both sides continue to deploy warships in the contested area.

As in Sudan, multiple factors are driving this clash, but energy is the dominant motive. The South China Sea is thought to harbor large deposits of oil and natural gas, and all the countries that encircle it, including China and the Philippines, want to exploit these reserves. Manila claims a 200-nautical mile “exclusive economic zone” stretching into the South China Sea from its western shores, an area it calls the West Philippine Sea; Filipino companies say they have found large natural gas reserves in this area and have announced plans to begin exploiting them. Claiming the many small islands that dot the South China Sea (including Scarborough Shoal) as its own, Beijing has asserted sovereignty over the entire region, including the waters claimed by Manila; it, too, has announced plans to drill in the area. Despite years of talks, no solution has yet been found to the dispute and further clashes are likely.

* Egypt cuts off the natural gas flow to Israel: On April 22nd, the Egyptian General Petroleum Corporation and Egyptian Natural Gas Holding Companyinformed Israeli energy officials that they were “terminating the gas and purchase agreement” under which Egypt had been supplying gas to Israel. This followed months of demonstrations in Cairo by the youthful protestors who succeeded in deposing autocrat Hosni Mubarak and are now seeking a more independent Egyptian foreign policy — one less beholden to the United States and Israel. It also followed scores of attacks on the pipelines carrying the gas across the Negev Desert to Israel, which the Egyptian military has seemed powerless to prevent.

Ostensibly, the decision was taken in response to a dispute over Israeli payments for Egyptian gas, but all parties involved have interpreted it as part of a drive by Egypt’s new government to demonstrate greater distance from the ousted Mubarak regime and his (U.S.-encouraged) policy of cooperation with Israel. The Egyptian-Israeli gas link was one of the most significant outcomes of the 1979 peace treaty between the two countries, and its annulment clearly signals a period of greater discord; it may also cause energy shortages in Israel, especially during peak summer demand periods. On a larger scale, the cutoff suggests a new inclination to use energy (or its denial) as a form of political warfare and coercion.

* Argentina seizes YPF: On April 16th, Argentina’s president, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, announced that her government would seize a majority stake in YPF, the nation’s largest oil company. Under President Kirchner’s plans, which she detailed on national television, the government would take a 51% controlling stake in YPF, which is now majority-owned by Spain’s largest corporation, the energy firm Repsol YPF. The seizure of its Argentinean subsidiary is seen in Madrid (and other European capitals) as a major threat that must now be combated. Spain’s foreign minister, José Manuel García Margallo, said that Kirchner’s move “broke the climate of cordiality and friendship that presided over relations between Spain and Argentina.” Several days later, in what is reported to be only the first of several retaliatory steps, Spain announced that it would stop importing biofuels from Argentina, its principal supplier — a trade worth nearly $1 billion a year to the Argentineans.

As in the other conflicts, this clash is driven by many urges, including a powerful strain of nationalism stretching back to the Peronist era, along with Kirchner’s apparent desire to boost her standing in the polls. Just as important, however, is Argentina’s urge to derive greater economic and political benefit from its energy reserves, which include the world’s third-largest deposits of shale gas. While long-term rival Brazil is gaining immense power and prestige from the development of its offshore “pre-salt”petroleum reserves, Argentina has seen its energy production languish. Repsol may not be to blame for this, but many Argentineans evidently believe that, with YPF under government control, it will now be possible to accelerate development of the country’s energy endowment, possibly in collaboration with a more aggressive foreign partner like BP or ExxonMobil.

* Argentina re-ignites the Falklands crisis: At an April 15th-16th Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia — the one at which U.S. Secret Service agents were caught fraternizing with prostitutes — Argentina sought fresh hemispheric condemnation of Britain’s continued occupation of the Falkland Islands (called Las Malvinas by the Argentineans). It won strong support from every country present save (predictably) Canada and the United States. Argentina, which says the islands are part of its sovereign territory, has been raising this issue ever since it lost a war over the Falklands in 1982, but has recently stepped up its campaign on several fronts — denouncing London in numerous international venues and preventing British cruise ships that visit the Falklands from docking in Argentinean harbors. The British have responded by beefing up their military forces in the region and warning the Argentineans to avoid any rash moves.

When Argentina and the U.K. fought their war over the Falklands, little was at stake save national pride, the stature of the country’s respective leaders (Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher vs. an unpopular military junta), and a few sparsely populated islands. Since then, the stakes have risen immeasurably as a result of recent seismic surveys of the waters surrounding the islands that indicated the existence of massive deposits of oil and natural gas. Several UK-based energy firms, including Desire Petroleum and Rockhopper Exploration, have begun off-shore drilling in the area and have reported promising discoveries. Desperate to duplicate Brazil’s success in the development of offshore oil and gas, Argentina claims the discoveries lie in its sovereign territory and that the drilling there is illegal; the British, of course, insist that it’s their territory. No one knows how this simmering potential crisis will unfold, but a replay of the 1982 war — this time over energy — is hardly out of the question.

* U.S. forces mobilize for war with Iran: Throughout the winter and early spring, it appeared that an armed clash of some sort pitting Iran against Israel and/or the United States was almost inevitable. Neither side seemed prepared to back down on key demands, especially on Iran’s nuclear program, and any talk of a compromise solution was deemed unrealistic. Today, however, the risk of war has diminished somewhat – at least through this election year in the U.S. — as talks have finally gotten under way between the major powers and Iran, and as both have adopted (slightly) more accommodating stances. In addition, U.S. officials have been tamping down war talk and figures in the Israeli military and intelligence communities have spoken out against rash military actions. However, the Iranians continue to enrich uranium, and leaders on all sides say they are fully prepared to employ force if the peace talks fail.

For the Iranians, this means blocking the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow channel through which one-third of the world’s tradable oil passes every day. The U.S., for its part, has insisted that it will keep the Strait open and, if necessary, eliminate Iranian nuclear capabilities. Whether to intimidate Iran, prepare for the real thing, or possibly both, the U.S. has been building up its military capabilities in the Persian Gulf area, deploying two aircraft carrier battle groupsin the neighborhood along with an assortment of air and amphibious-assault capabilities.

One can debate the extent to which Washington’s long-running feud with Iran is driven by oil, but there is no question that the current crisis bears heavily on global oil supply prospects, both through Iran’s threats to close the Strait of Hormuz in retaliation for forthcoming sanctions on Iranian oil exports, and the likelihood that any air strikes on Iranian nuclear facilities will lead to the same thing. Either way, the U.S. military would undoubtedly assume the lead role in destroying Iranian military capabilities and restoring oil traffic through the Strait of Hormuz. This is the energy-driven crisis that just won’t go away.

How Energy Drives the World

All of these disputes have one thing in common: the conviction of ruling elites around the world that the possession of energy assets — especially oil and gas deposits — is essential to prop up national wealth, power, and prestige.

This is hardly a new phenomenon. Early in the last century, Winston Churchill was perhaps the first prominent leader to appreciate the strategic importance of oil. As First Lord of the Admiralty, he converted British warships from coal to oil and then persuaded the cabinet to nationalize the Anglo-Persian Oil Company, the forerunner of British Petroleum (now BP). The pursuit of energy supplies for both industry and war-fighting played a major role in the diplomacy of the period between the World Wars, as well as in the strategic planning of the Axis powers during World War II. It also explains America’s long-term drive to remain the dominant power in the Persian Gulf that culminated in the first Gulf War of 1990-91 and its inevitable sequel, the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

The years since World War II have seen a variety of changes in the energy industry, including a shift in many areas from private to state ownership of oil and natural gas reserves. By and large, however, the industry has been able to deliver ever-increasing quantities of fuel to satisfy the ever-growing needs of a globalizing economy and an expanding, rapidly urbanizing world population. So long as supplies were abundant and prices remained relatively affordable, energy consumers around the world, including most governments, were largely content with the existing system of collaboration among private and state-owned energy leviathans.

But that energy equation is changing ominously as the challenge of fueling the planet grows more difficult. Many of the giant oil and gas fields that quenched the world’s energy thirst in years past are being depleted at a rapid pace. The new fields being brought on line to take their place are, on average, smaller and harder to exploit. Many of the most promising new sources of energy — like Brazil’s “pre-salt” petroleum reserves deep beneath the Atlantic Ocean, Canadian tar sands, and American shale gas – require the utilization of sophisticated and costly technologies. Though global energy supplies are continuing to grow, they are doing so at a slower pace than in the past and are continually falling short of demand. All this adds to the upward pressure on prices, causing anxiety among countries lacking adequate domestic reserves (and joy among those with an abundance).

The world has long been bifurcated between energy-surplus and energy-deficit states, with the former deriving enormous political and economic advantages from their privileged condition and the latter struggling mightily to escape their subordinate position. Now, that bifurcation is looking more like a chasm. In such a global environment, friction and conflict over oil and gas reserves — leading to energy conflicts of all sorts — is only likely to increase.

Looking, again, at April’s six energy disputes, one can see clear evidence of these underlying forces in every case. South Sudan is desperate to sell its oil in order to acquire the income needed to kick-start its economy; Sudan, on the other hand, resents the loss of oil revenues it controlled when the nation was still united, and appears no less determined to keep as much of the South’s oil money as it can for itself. China and the Philippines both want the right to develop oil and gas reserves in the South China Sea, and even if the deposits around Scarborough Shoal prove meager, China is unwilling to back down in any localized dispute that might undermine its claim to sovereignty over the entire region.

Egypt, although not a major energy producer, clearly seeks to employ its oil and gas supplies for maximum political and economic advantage — an approach sure to be copied by other small and mid-sized suppliers. Israel, heavily dependent on imports for its energy, must now turn elsewhere for vital supplies or accelerate the development of disputed, newly discovered offshore gas fields, a move that could provoke fresh conflict with Lebanon, which says they lie in its own territorial waters. And Argentina, jealous of Brazil’s growing clout, appears determined to extract greater advantage from its own energy resources, even if this means inflaming tensions with Spain and Great Britain.



How many more will die for oil
And these are just some of the countries involved in significant disputes over energy. Any clash with Iran — whatever the motivation — is bound to jeopardize the petroleum supply of every oil-importing country, sparking a major international crisis with unforeseeable consequences. 

China’s determination to control its offshore hydrocarbon reserves has pushed it into conflict with other countries with offshore claims in the South China Sea, and into a similar dispute with Japan in the East China Sea. Energy-related disputes of this sort can also be found in the Caspian Sea and in globally warming, increasingly ice-free Arctic regions.

The seeds of energy conflicts and war sprouting in so many places simultaneously suggest that we are entering a new period in which key state actors will be more inclined to employ force — or the threat of force — to gain control over valuable deposits of oil and natural gas. In other words, we’re now on a planet heading into energy overdrive.

Michael T. Klare is a professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and the author, most recently, of Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet and The Race for What’s Left.

This article originally appeared on TomDispatch.



Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.


Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.






'NATO-Backed Death Squads Basic Cause of Syria Unrest'‎ - Videos

NATO almost finished stripping carcass of Libya, needs fresh meat, fresh wars

PRESS TV
05/10/2012

Interview with Webster Griffin Tarpley

NATO-backed death squads financed by countries such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar are at the heart of the bloodshed in Syria, a political analyst tells Press TV.


Webster Griffin Tarpley
The comment comes as on May 9, a bomb attack targeted a Syrian military truck escorting a convoy of UN observers near the southwestern city of Dara’a. Six Syrian soldiers were wounded in the attack.

Head of the UN mission Major General Robert Mood was also in the convoy, but neither he nor any of the other monitors sustained injuries.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon expressed concern about the attack in Dara’a on Wednesday.

Press TV has conducted an interview with author and historian Webster Griffin Tarpley to further discuss the issue.

The video also offers the opinions of two other guests: member of the Syrian Social Club, Haitham Alsibahie and political analyst, Jihad Mouracadeh.

What follows is an approximate transcription of the interview.

Press TV:  Webster Griffin Tarpley, in response to our guest in Beirut (Jihad Mouracadeh) and ultimately who is going to benefit from this (Syria's ceasefire not working)?


Kofi Annan's "peace mission" has obviously, disastrously, failed

Tarpley:  It's hard to see anybody benefiting but in terms of who did it I think these are the death squads, these are the NATO-backed death squads financed by Saudi Arabia, by Qatar and others that are at the root of this entire situation as I found on the ground in Damascus, in Homs and in Baniyas back in mid-November.

One could hardly imagine a more embarrassing moment for the United Nations bureaucracy with their, really, appeasement approach towards these death squads and to have their own observers attacked by the death squads and of course the death squads are some pretty lawless people. It's not clear that they're under control at all times.


With Annan's failure, Assad becomes emboldened
Press TV:  Webster Griffin Tarpley, can you elaborate a little more who these death squads are, who is in them, like these allegations of al-Qaeda etcetera?

Tarpley:  We had a very interesting presentation at the Stakeout at the United Nations Security Council yesterday where the Syrian Ambassador [Bashar] Ja'afari came out and said I think with more detail than before, he has a CD that he was showing.

I think world public opinion would like to see it. His CD shows the confessions of 20 or 25 foreign fighters, people from Libya, people from Turkey, maybe from other places, maybe from farther afield.

My impression was that they were people from Algeria, from Chechnya, from the stands in Central Asia and he pointed out that these groups are being infiltrated with the help of Turkey, with the help of Lebanon and in particular I would have the [Lebanese Prime Minister] Rafiq Hariri group in Lebanon and they are getting money from the reactionary feudal Gulf monarchies, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and a couple of others. So I think that was an important moment.


Syrian doctors, hospitals overwhelmed by dead, injured; Assad accuses "foreign agents" of creating unrest

Now in terms of Kofi Anan, Kofi Annan is a typical representative of the school of British, colonial administrators and he is clever but he is essentially involved in a game of deception. He is now repeating this mantra of civil war, civil war, civil war.

We've heard that from Hillary Clinton back in November. She said she saw a civil war when nobody else could see it. But she has been trying to bring it about. I think we have a situation at the United Nations that reminds us of how the League of Nations was destroyed in the 1930s.

If you don't stand up to international terrorism and aggression which in this case is targeting Syria then you may go in the way of the league. Ban Ki-moon- I don't see how he can continue in office, his performance yesterday at the Atlantic Council here in the United States was one of the most deplorable one-sided farces I've ever seen.

Kofi Anan is of course cleverer. I would say to Kofi Anan, why don't you stop beating round the bush. Set up a peace table in Geneva and invite the Syrian government and invite the so called opposition and see who comes.

The Syrian government will be there but these opposition groups probably won't come because they've been told by their backers in NATO and the Gulf you're not allowed to negotiate. They don't want a negotiated solution; they want the pretext to… break the country up.

Press TV:  Webster Griffin Tarpley, explain to our guest in Beirut, perhaps I couldn't, about al-Qaeda and how the US and al-Qaeda have one goal in common and that's this regime change that they both have in common therefore doesn't that make it that US is supporting al-Qaeda vice-versa since they both have the same goal in mind?

Tarpley:  Absolutely, yes al-Qaeda after all as I have argued for many years al-Qaeda is the CIA Arab legion. It was created by the CIA, by the British MI6, for Afghanistan and to fight enemies of NATO- in that case it was the Soviet Union and it has been used repeatedly for that purpose.

We all have before our eyes the example of Libya last year, Libya was assaulted by a NATO air force last year but the infantry on the ground was overwhelmingly composed of people, the commanders at least like [Libyan revolutionary Abdelhakim] Belhadj who has been mentioned these commanders were dyed-in-the-wool al-Qaeda operatives and that point was made by Ambassador Ja'afari yesterday.

I would say however that Ambassador Ja'afari needed to go further because he mentioned other powers and he was asked in the Q&A what other powers do you mean? Of course he wouldn't say those are the United States, Britain, France, the NATO states and the Israelis.

We got a big article in the Washington Post here today about how the Israelis are absolutely committed to getting President Assad out. We've got Steinmetz, the Israeli politician Steinmetz who is one of the members of that octet that decides over peace and war.

He says for the whole world we've got to bring down Assad. Well, for the whole world I'm afraid not. The other thing is if you want to give a case support, we have Giuseppe Navarro, [who] is the apostolic vicar in Aleppo- he is a representative of the Vatican.

He was asked about 4 people, 4 students were killed in Aleppo in the last couple of days and I think this is absolutely typical. He said Turkish and Libyan foreign fighter fanatics, Jihadist had gotten themselves into the buildings of the universities, the dormitories and started shooting at the Syrian army and then when there was a counter move by the Syrian army naturally some students got caught in the middle.

That is the reality. There is- there was at least a kind of a peaceful democratic protest but the problem is from the very beginning in March, right from the word go, there where snipers from these death squads that were shooting at policemen and troops in order to create a counter response that would get civilians killed that is the reality the whole time.

Any analysis that doesn't start with the death squads and the role of [American diplomat John Dimitri] Negroponte in Baghdad and then Robert Ford in Damascus I would actually ask [Head of United Nations Supervision Mission in Syria, Major] General Robert Mood if you were there from 2009 to 2011 in Damascus what did you know about the formation of these death squads. That would be a really interesting question.

Press TV:  OK. Webster Griffin Tarpley, your response quickly [to Jihad Mouracadeh].

Tarpley:  Well, we just had an election these opposition groups boycotted it I suspect because they knew they would lose. That Assad… 65 percent popularity, 70 percent

Mouracadeh:
  These are not free elections, bring some international observers. I don't care. The numbers don't mean anything. You are talking about a single party. I want a free election under international supervision then I will believe it.

Tarpley:
  Yes, but you have… I'd like to have an election where I say Obama has to resign before we have an election or the Republican Congress has to resign. This is not democracy. That's what you're calling for…

VG/GHN











Videos:  You Tube

Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.



18-Month-Old Baby Pulled from Flight, Parents Interrogated by TSA

Test case to see if they can get away with it - expect "pesky" journalists, patriots to be next to "disappear" from flight manifests, after having a fist crammed up the keister by TSA pedophile rapist criminals


The Side Show
By Eric Pfeiffer
05/11/2012

The parents of an 18-month-old girl say they were "humiliated" after being pulled off a plane and told their young child had been placed on a no-fly list.


TSA "experimenting" with children victims - Shame on parents
After boarding a JetBlue flight in Ft. Lauderdale, the parents of young Riyanna, who asked to remain anonymous over fears of repercussions, were told the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) wanted to interview their toddler.

"And I said, 'For what?'" Riyanna's mother told ABC affiliate WPBF 25 News on Wednesday. "And he said, 'Well, it's not you or your husband. Your daughter was flagged as no fly.' I said, 'Excuse me?'"

Whoever is to blame, the parents say they believe the incident began because they are both of Middle Eastern descent and because the wife wears a hijab, a traditional headscarf. A 2011 poll from the Pew Research Center found that Muslim Americans say they believe they are disproportionately singled out by airport security officers.


TSA Chief John Pistole wants cameras in rectums
Eventually, the couple were given their boarding passes back. Interesting, both JetBlue and the TSA tell WPBF they weren't responsible for the incident. The TSA says that because the couple and their child were eventually issued boarding passes, Riyanna could not have been on the no-fly list.

"TSA did not flag this child as being on the No Fly list," the group said in a statement to the Atlanta Journal Constitution. "TSA was called to the gate by the airline and after talking to the parents and confirming through our vetting system, TSA determined the airline had mistakenly indicated the child was on a government watch list."

JetBlue told WPBF that both the airline and the TSA are investigating the incident.

"We were humiliated. We were embarrassed. We were picked on," Riyanna's father told the station.

The family decided to leave the airport rather than return to the flight.







Video:  You Tube


Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.





Georgia Student Fighting Flesh-Eating Disease After Zip Line Injury, Health Officials Say SHE is Cause of Infection - Videos

Blaming the victim:  Not so "sneaky" super-bacteria created by CDC and spread worldwide with assistance from WHO now killing in America, cover-up underway


Good Morning America
By Katie Moisse
05/09/2012

A Georgia woman is fighting for her life after contracting flesh-eating disease during a zip line accident.


How to Diagnose Necrotizing Fasciitis

Aimee Copeland, a 24-year old master's student at the University of West Georgia, hopped on the homemade zip line during a kayaking trip with friends in Carrollton, Ga. But the line broke, cutting a gash in Copeland's left calf and introducing a life-threatening infection that on Friday claimed her left leg and part of her abdomen.

"It's a miracle she made it past Friday night," Copeland's father, Andy, told ABC affiliate WSBTV.

Cuts in the skin open the door for flesh-eating disease flesh-eating disease, officially known as necrotizing fasciitis, a rare strep infection that borrows deep into wounds and destroys the surrounding tissue.

"The bacteria produce enzymes that can dissolve muscle deep down," said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and president of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. "And because it's so deep, it can be a sneaky infection that's not immediately appreciated by the patient."


This disease and it's sudden appearance is no mistake
After the injury last Tuesday, Copeland went to a nearby emergency room where doctors closed the gash with 22 staples. But she returned to the hospital the next day complaining of severe pain.

"The symptom that should ring alarm bells is serious, unremitting pain," said Schaffner. "An otherwise healthy individual with a seemingly superficial injury who has severe pain should have a much more thorough evaluation."

Doctors sent Copeland home with a prescription for painkillers. She returned to the hospital again Thursday and was released again, this time with antibiotics. On Friday, Copeland was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis, and her left leg was amputated at the hip.

"The two main treatment options are antibiotics to kill the bacteria and surgery," said Schaffner, adding that bacteria left behind can invade the blood. "You have to look at the wound and think, 'This is as far as the infection has gone; now I have to cut even further.'"


Ghastly, and most likely MAN-MADE

Where the infection came from is unclear, but Schaffner said the most likely culprit is Copeland's own throat.

"It could have come from an outside source; some other person who was perhaps helping clean and dress the wound," he said, adding that the bacteria is transmitted through respiratory droplets. "But more often than not, sadly, it turns out to be the patient's own bacteria."

Frequent hand washing, and avoiding people with sore throats can help reduce the risk of flesh-eating disease, according to the National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation. And all cuts, no matter how small, and should be cleaned and covered with sterile bandages.

Since the amputation, Copeland's recovery has been touch and go. On Tuesday, one week after the accident, her temperature spiked and she lost her pulse.

"They actually were able to do CPR and resuscitate her very quickly," Andy Copeland told WSBTV. "I don't want people with long faces right now because we already had a miracle Friday night when she survived. … I just believe we have to stay positive right now to honor Aimee."










Videos:  You Tube


Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This news site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ANDREW KREIG: EXPERTS REJECT FIRE AS CAUSE FOR 9/11 WTC COLLAPSES

The real truth on 9/11 slowly continues to bleed out

 photo
Technical experts are mounting major challenges to official U.S. government accounts of how three World Trade Center skyscrapers collapsed in near-freefall after the 9/11 attacks 15 years ago.

Many researchers are focusing especially on the little-known collapse of

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Geopolitics Of The United States, Part 1: The Inevitable Empire

The Empire and the inevitable fall of the Obama criminal regime

 photo
STRATFOR Editor’s Note: This installment on the United States, presented in two parts, is the 16th in a series of STRATFOR monographs on the geopolitics of countries influential in world affairs.

Like nearly all of the peoples of North and South America, most Americans are not originally from the territory that became the United States.

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Geopolitics Of The United States Part 2: American Identity And The Threats of Tomorrow

A look back at 2011 predictions for the future in order to put events of today into perspective

 photo capitalism_zpsah78uy5p.jpg
We have already discussed in the first part of this analysis how the American geography dooms whoever controls the territory to being a global power, but there are a number of other outcomes that shape what that power will be like. The first and most critical is the impact of that geography on the American mindset.

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


By Robert S. Finnegan

This e-mail outlines and confirms the acts of espionage against Indonesia and Indonesians by Akiko Makino and the others involved both in Kobe University and in AI Lab at University of Airlangga, Surabaya; Bahasa Indonesia original follows English translation...

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UPDATED 01/07/2015 : New Analysis Challenges Tamiflu Efficacy; Hong Kong Corona Virus Outbreak

UPDATED 01/07/2015 : FOX NEWS CORPORATE PHARMA SHILL MEGAN KELLY AND FOX NEWS QUACK DOCTOR NOW PUSHING TAMIFLU FOR PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN;

 photo TAMIFLU_small_zpssojx6okt.jpg
THE 5TH ESTATE UNEQUIVOCALLY WARNS THE PUBLIC NOT TO TAKE OR GIVE THIS PROVEN DANGEROUS, INEFFECTIVE DRUG TO ANYONE

Obama criminals now resulting to biowarfare in quest to destroy Chinese and ASEAN economy; "novel virus substrain" points directly to a Kawaoka / Fouchier / Ernala-Ginting Kobe lab virus weaponized and genetically altered to specifically target and infect the Asian population: Ribavirin...

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 photo WHO02_zpsplmhtlpr.jpg
The 5th Estate has just purchased a library on H5N1 "Novel" virus pandemics, there are dozens of PDF and Exel documents we feel will assist you in saving lives following intentional releases of the H5N1 and now MERS viruses; we will begin by printing those that appear to be extremely relevant here: H5N1 Kobe-Kawaoka-Ernala series continues soon with more "Smoking Gun" e-mails from Teridah Ernala to The 5th Estate . . .

READ MORE >>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


By Robert S. Finnegan

On October 12, 2002 the Indonesian island of Bali experienced a terrorist attack that rocked the world. It was unquestionably well-coordinated and executed, the largest in the country's history.

READ MORE >>