Thursday, January 05, 2012

War Imminent in Strait of Hormuz? $200 a Barrel Oil?


How about $500.00 a barrel?

OilPrice.com
By John C.K. Daly
 
Since 24, December the Iranian Navy has been holding its ten-day Velayat 90 naval exercises, covering an area in the Arabian Sea stretching from east of the Strait of Hormuz entrance to the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Aden. The day the maneuvers opened Iranian Navy Commander Rear Admiral Habibollah Sayyari told a press conference that the exercises were intended to show "Iran's military prowess and defense capabilities in international waters, convey a message of peace and friendship to regional countries, and test the newest military equipment." The exercise is Iran's first naval training drill since May 2010, when the country held its Velayat 89 naval maneuvers in the same area. Velayat 90 is the largest naval exercise the country has ever held.

The participating Iranian forces have been divided into two groups, blue and orange, with the blue group representing Iranian forces and orange the enemy. Velayat 90 is involving the full panoply of Iranian naval force, with destroyers, missile boats, logistical support ships, hovercraft, aircraft, drones and advanced coastal missiles and torpedoes all being deployed. Tactics include mine-laying exercises and preparations for chemical attack. Iranian naval commandos, marines and divers are also participating.

The exercises have put Iranian warships in close proximity to vessels of the United States Fifth Fleet, based in Bahrain, which patrols some of the same waters, including the Strait of Hormuz, a 21 mile-wide waterway at its narrowest point. Roughly 40 percent of the world's oil tanker shipments transit the strait daily, carrying 15.5 million barrels of Saudi, Iraqi, Iranian, Kuwaiti, Bahraini, Qatari and United Arab Emirates crude oil, leading the United States Energy Information Administration to label the Strait of Hormuz "the world's most important oil chokepoint."

In light of Iran's recent capture of an advanced CIA RQ-170 Sentinel drone earlier this month, Iranian Navy Rear Admiral Seyed Mahmoud Moussavi noted that the Iranian Velayat 90 forces also conducted electronic warfare tests, using modern Iranian-made electronic jamming equipment to disrupt enemy radar and contact systems. Further tweaking Uncle Sam's nose, Moussavi added that Iranian Navy drones involved in Velayat 90 conducted successful patrolling and surveillance operations.

Thousands of miles to the west, adding oil to the fire, President Obama is preparing to sign legislation that, if fully enforced, could impose harsh penalties on all customers for Iranian oil, with the explicit aim of severely impeding Iran's ability to sell it.

How serious are the Iranians about the proposed sanctions and possible attack over its civilian nuclear program and what can they deploy if push comes to shove? According to the International Institute for Strategic Studies' The Military Balance 2011, Iran has 23 submarines, 100+ "coastal and combat" patrol craft, 5 mine warfare and anti-mine craft, 13 amphibious landing vessels and 26 "logistics and support" ships. Add to that the fact that Iran has emphasized that it has developed indigenous "asymmetrical warfare" naval doctrines, and it is anything but clear what form Iran's naval response to sanctions or attack could take. The only certainty is that it is unlikely to resemble anything taught at the U.S. Naval Academy.

The proposed Obama administration energy sanctions heighten the risk of confrontation and carry the possibility of immense economic disruption from soaring oil prices, given the unpredictability of the Iranian response. Addressing the possibility of tightened oil sanctions Iran's first vice president Mohammad-Reza Rahimi on 27 December said, "If they impose sanctions on Iran's oil exports, then even one drop of oil cannot flow from the Strait of Hormuz."

Iran has earlier warned that if either the U.S. or Israel attack, it will target 32 American bases in the Middle East and close the Strait of Hormuz. On 28 December Iranian Navy commander Rear Admiral Habibollah Sayyari observed, "Closing the Strait of Hormuz for the armed forces of the Islamic Republic of Iran is very easy. It is a capability that has been built from the outset into our naval forces' abilities."

But adding an apparent olive branch Sayyari added, "But today we are not in the Hormuz Strait. We are in the Sea of Oman and we do not need to close the Hormuz Strait. Today we are just dealing with the Sea of Oman. Therefore, we can control it from right here and this is one of our prime abilities for such vital straits and our abilities are far, far more than they think."

There are dim lights at the end of the seemingly darker and darker tunnel. The proposed sanctions legislation allows Obama to waive sanctions if they cause the price of oil to rise or threaten national security.

Furthermore, there is the wild card of Iran's oil customers, the most prominent of which is China, which would hardly be inclined to go along with increased sanctions.

But one thing should be clear in Washington - however odious the U.S. government might find Iran's mullahcracy, it is most unlikely to cave in to either economic or military intimidation that would threaten the nation's existence, and if backed up against the wall with no way out, would just as likely go for broke and use every weapon at its disposal to defend itself. Given their evident cyber abilities in hacking the RQ-170 Sentinel drone and their announcement of an indigenous naval doctrine, a "cakewalk" victory with "mission accomplished" declared within a few short weeks seems anything but assured, particularly as it would extend the military arc of crisis from Iraq through Iran to Afghanistan, a potential shambolic military quagmire beyond Washington's, NATO's and Tel Aviv's resources to quell.

It is worth remembering that chess was played in Sassanid Iran 1,400 years ago, where it was known as "chatrang." What is occurring now off the Persian Gulf is a diplomatic and military game of chess, with global implications.

Washington's concept of squeezing a country's government by interfering with its energy policies has a dolorous history seven decades old.

When Japan invaded Vichy French-ruled southern Indo-China in July 1941 the U.S. demanded Japan withdraw. In addition, on 1 August the U.S., Japan's biggest oil supplier at the time, imposed an oil embargo on the country.

Pearl Harbor occurred less than four months later.

John C.K. Daly is a frequent contributor to Global Research.
  
Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


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The U.S. war in Iraq ended just before Christmas, and if you blinked you probably missed it. TV news coaxed some seasonal sentiment out of the troops getting home for the holidays, but the Sunday-morning talk shows - where news of consequence is usually autopsied - barely noticed. The Beltway sages had weightier matters to discuss, such as the Gingrich ascendancy and the latest congressional standoff. The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best, and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again. Besides, the Iraq victory lap was used up back in 2003 when George W. Bush, in a supreme moment of presidential buffoonery, pranced across a carrier deck in flight regalia to declare peace just as a calamitous civil war was starting. So while the news media might like to imply that the war concluded successfully, that's a hard case to make, especially with our Iraqi friends referring to it as a "foreign occupation." And faced with a perplexing moment of historical ambiguity, the media did what they do whenever a clean story line eludes them - change the subject. Our country isn't unique in making war needlessly, but we may be unique in our insouciance. Attention really should be paid. After all, destroying another country is a big deal. Between 105,000 and 130,000 Iraqi civilians died violently, and half a million more were lost to degraded infrastructure, lousy healthcare and other miseries caused by years of murderous strife uncorked by the U.S. invasion. Some two million Iraqis are now refugees, and hundreds of thousands of ordinary lives have been mutilated. You'd think some sort of examination is in order: Congressional hearings? A truth and reconciliation commission? At least, an extended segment on 60 Minutes? The events of 9/11 triggered hearings, commissions, reports, reappraisals, soul-searching, reorganizations, sweeping legislation. But the immeasurably greater catastrophe of the Iraq war has brought no comparable reckoning. Forget apologies. The United States doesn't do apologies. The closest our media have come to voicing regret is lamenting the war's trillion-dollar cost and the torments of our own combatants, the 4,500 military personnel killed and many thousands maimed physically or psychologically. It's estimated that of the 2.8 million who have served since 2001, some 30 percent will live with physical or psychological disability. These young people heeded the country's call to duty, but the media do little more than pander to them as "returning heroes," rather than honor their service by demanding to know why anybody thought it was necessary. What was that all about anyway? Shouldn't we ask? The media got plenty of criticism for swallowing the lies and stoking the fires of war beforehand. But what about now? Are there no lessons to be learned? This isn't the first U.S. war in living memory that was shoved under the carpet. President Ford inaugurated the modern policy of "never mind" after Saigon fell in April 1975 when he declared: "This action closes a chapter in the American experience. I ask all Americans to close ranks, to avoid recrimination about the past ..." Ford's approach became a classic of U.S. official spin. It holds, first, that even if the harrowing cost of a policy blunder falls overwhelmingly on other people, it's still an "American" experience. (An arrogant perspective, to be sure. How many foreign deaths does it take for them to get their own "chapter?") And second, Ford warned, no "recrimination." That admonition defies a fundamental tenet of democratic systems - the indispensability of holding leaders accountable. Policy failure should be examined carefully, and responsibility assigned accordingly. That doesn't prohibit forgiveness, but it insists that mistakes be understood so they aren't repeated. We're seeing none of that. The political elite won't touch this war. Nobody's pushing them to (not even the street protesters), and they have nothing to gain. The Republicans don't want to remind anybody about Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld. The Democrats fear that anything they do would be attacked as a partisan stunt, and that their own complicity in the debacle would be exposed. The only public institution that could initiate the kind of broad-gauged examination that a disaster of this magnitude demands is the media. From the strategic folly, to the use of torture, the destruction of civilian life, the profiteering, the political miscalculation - the years of ineptitude need to be exposed and explained, and those responsible made to answer. If the media's core civic duty is to serve as a check on power, surely no abuse of power calls forth that duty more urgently than the needless infliction of war. ABOUT THE WRITER Edward Wasserman is Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University. He wrote this column for The Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132; website: www.edwardwasserman.com.

Read more here: http://www.centredaily.com/2012/01/04/3039932/media-awol-in-exposing-iraq-wars.html#storylink=cpy
The U.S. war in Iraq ended just before Christmas, and if you blinked you probably missed it. TV news coaxed some seasonal sentiment out of the troops getting home for the holidays, but the Sunday-morning talk shows - where news of consequence is usually autopsied - barely noticed. The Beltway sages had weightier matters to discuss, such as the Gingrich ascendancy and the latest congressional standoff. The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best, and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again. Besides, the Iraq victory lap was used up back in 2003 when George W. Bush, in a supreme moment of presidential buffoonery, pranced across a carrier deck in flight regalia to declare peace just as a calamitous civil war was starting. So while the news media might like to imply that the war concluded successfully, that's a hard case to make, especially with our Iraqi friends referring to it as a "foreign occupation." And faced with a perplexing moment of historical ambiguity, the media did what they do whenever a clean story line eludes them - change the subject. Our country isn't unique in making war needlessly, but we may be unique in our insouciance. Attention really should be paid. After all, destroying another country is a big deal. Between 105,000 and 130,000 Iraqi civilians died violently, and half a million more were lost to degraded infrastructure, lousy healthcare and other miseries caused by years of murderous strife uncorked by the U.S. invasion. Some two million Iraqis are now refugees, and hundreds of thousands of ordinary lives have been mutilated. You'd think some sort of examination is in order: Congressional hearings? A truth and reconciliation commission? At least, an extended segment on 60 Minutes? The events of 9/11 triggered hearings, commissions, reports, reappraisals, soul-searching, reorganizations, sweeping legislation. But the immeasurably greater catastrophe of the Iraq war has brought no comparable reckoning. Forget apologies. The United States doesn't do apologies. The closest our media have come to voicing regret is lamenting the war's trillion-dollar cost and the torments of our own combatants, the 4,500 military personnel killed and many thousands maimed physically or psychologically. It's estimated that of the 2.8 million who have served since 2001, some 30 percent will live with physical or psychological disability. These young people heeded the country's call to duty, but the media do little more than pander to them as "returning heroes," rather than honor their service by demanding to know why anybody thought it was necessary. What was that all about anyway? Shouldn't we ask? The media got plenty of criticism for swallowing the lies and stoking the fires of war beforehand. But what about now? Are there no lessons to be learned? This isn't the first U.S. war in living memory that was shoved under the carpet. President Ford inaugurated the modern policy of "never mind" after Saigon fell in April 1975 when he declared: "This action closes a chapter in the American experience. I ask all Americans to close ranks, to avoid recrimination about the past ..." Ford's approach became a classic of U.S. official spin. It holds, first, that even if the harrowing cost of a policy blunder falls overwhelmingly on other people, it's still an "American" experience. (An arrogant perspective, to be sure. How many foreign deaths does it take for them to get their own "chapter?") And second, Ford warned, no "recrimination." That admonition defies a fundamental tenet of democratic systems - the indispensability of holding leaders accountable. Policy failure should be examined carefully, and responsibility assigned accordingly. That doesn't prohibit forgiveness, but it insists that mistakes be understood so they aren't repeated. We're seeing none of that. The political elite won't touch this war. Nobody's pushing them to (not even the street protesters), and they have nothing to gain. The Republicans don't want to remind anybody about Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld. The Democrats fear that anything they do would be attacked as a partisan stunt, and that their own complicity in the debacle would be exposed. The only public institution that could initiate the kind of broad-gauged examination that a disaster of this magnitude demands is the media. From the strategic folly, to the use of torture, the destruction of civilian life, the profiteering, the political miscalculation - the years of ineptitude need to be exposed and explained, and those responsible made to answer. If the media's core civic duty is to serve as a check on power, surely no abuse of power calls forth that duty more urgently than the needless infliction of war. ABOUT THE WRITER Edward Wasserman is Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University. He wrote this column for The Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132; website: www.edwardwasserman.com.

Read more here: http://www.centredaily.com/2012/01/04/3039932/media-awol-in-exposing-iraq-wars.html#storylink=cpy
The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best, and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again.

Read more here: http://www.centredaily.com/2012/01/04/3039932/media-awol-in-exposing-iraq-wars.html#storylink=cpy
The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best, and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again.

Read more here: http://www.centredaily.com/2012/01/04/3039932/media-awol-in-exposing-iraq-wars.html#storylink=cpy
The U.S. war in Iraq ended just before Christmas, and if you blinked you probably missed it. TV news coaxed some seasonal sentiment out of the troops getting home for the holidays, but the Sunday-morning talk shows - where news of consequence is usually autopsied - barely noticed. The Beltway sages had weightier matters to discuss, such as the Gingrich ascendancy and the latest congressional standoff. The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again. Besides, the Iraq victory lap was used up back in 2003 when George W. Bush, in a supreme moment of presidential buffoonery, pranced across a carrier deck in flight regalia to declare peace just as a calamitous civil war was starting. So while the news media might like to imply that the war concluded successfully, that's a hard case to make, especially with our Iraqi friends referring to it as a "foreign occupation." And faced with a perplexing moment of historical ambiguity, the media did what they do whenever a clean story line eludes them - change the subject. Our country isn't unique in making war needlessly, but we may be in our insouciance. Attention really should be paid. Between 105,000 and 130,000 Iraqi civilians died violently, and half a million more were lost to degraded infrastructure, lousy health care and other miseries caused by years of murderous strife uncorked by the U.S. invasion. Some two million Iraqis are now refugees, and hundreds of thousands of ordinary lives have been mutilated. You'd think some sort of examination is in order: Congressional hearings? A truth and reconciliation commission? At least, an extended segment on 60 Minutes? The events of 9/11 triggered hearings, commissions, reports, reappraisals, soul-searching, reorganizations, sweeping legislation. But the immeasurably greater catastrophe of the Iraq war has brought no comparable reckoning. Forget apologies. The United States doesn't do apologies. The closest our media have come to voicing regret is lamenting the war's trillion-dollar cost and the torments of our own combatants, the 4,500 military personnel killed and many thousands maimed physically or psychologically. It's estimated that of the 2.8 million who have served since 2001, some 30 percent will live with physical or psychological disability. These young people heeded the country's call to duty, but the media do little more than pander to them as "returning heroes," rather than honor their service by demanding to know why anybody thought it was necessary. What was that all about anyway? Shouldn't we ask? The media got plenty of criticism for swallowing the lies and stoking the fires of war beforehand. But what about now? Are there no lessons to be learned? This isn't the first U.S. war shoved under the carpet. President Ford inaugurated the modern policy of "never mind" after Saigon fell in April 1975 when he declared: "This action closes a chapter in the American experience. I ask all Americans to close ranks, to avoid recrimination about the past ..." Ford's approach became a classic of U.S. official spin. It holds, first, that even if the harrowing cost of a policy blunder falls overwhelmingly on other people, it's still an "American" experience. And second, Ford warned, no "recrimination." That admonition defies a fundamental tenet of democratic systems - the indispensability of holding leaders accountable. Policy failure should be examined carefully, and responsibility assigned accordingly. That doesn't prohibit forgiveness, but it insists that mistakes be understood so they aren't repeated. We're seeing none of that. The political elite won't touch this war. Nobody's pushing them to (not even the street protesters), and they have nothing to gain. The Republicans don't want to remind anybody about Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld. The Democrats fear that anything they do would be attacked as a partisan stunt, and that their own complicity in the debacle would be exposed. The only public institution that could initiate the kind of broad-gauged examination that a disaster of this magnitude demands is the media. From the strategic folly, to the use of torture, the destruction of civilian life, the profiteering, the political miscalculation - the years of ineptitude need to be exposed and explained, and those responsible made to answer. If the media's core civic duty is to serve as a check on power, surely no abuse of power calls forth that duty more urgently than the needless infliction of war. Copyright 2012 . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Edward Wasserman is Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University. He wrote this column for The Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/01/05/2898696/media-awol-in-exposing-ineptitude.html#storylink=cpy
The U.S. war in Iraq ended just before Christmas, and if you blinked you probably missed it. TV news coaxed some seasonal sentiment out of the troops getting home for the holidays, but the Sunday-morning talk shows - where news of consequence is usually autopsied - barely noticed. The Beltway sages had weightier matters to discuss, such as the Gingrich ascendancy and the latest congressional standoff. The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again. Besides, the Iraq victory lap was used up back in 2003 when George W. Bush, in a supreme moment of presidential buffoonery, pranced across a carrier deck in flight regalia to declare peace just as a calamitous civil war was starting. So while the news media might like to imply that the war concluded successfully, that's a hard case to make, especially with our Iraqi friends referring to it as a "foreign occupation." And faced with a perplexing moment of historical ambiguity, the media did what they do whenever a clean story line eludes them - change the subject. Our country isn't unique in making war needlessly, but we may be in our insouciance. Attention really should be paid. Between 105,000 and 130,000 Iraqi civilians died violently, and half a million more were lost to degraded infrastructure, lousy health care and other miseries caused by years of murderous strife uncorked by the U.S. invasion. Some two million Iraqis are now refugees, and hundreds of thousands of ordinary lives have been mutilated. You'd think some sort of examination is in order: Congressional hearings? A truth and reconciliation commission? At least, an extended segment on 60 Minutes? The events of 9/11 triggered hearings, commissions, reports, reappraisals, soul-searching, reorganizations, sweeping legislation. But the immeasurably greater catastrophe of the Iraq war has brought no comparable reckoning. Forget apologies. The United States doesn't do apologies. The closest our media have come to voicing regret is lamenting the war's trillion-dollar cost and the torments of our own combatants, the 4,500 military personnel killed and many thousands maimed physically or psychologically. It's estimated that of the 2.8 million who have served since 2001, some 30 percent will live with physical or psychological disability. These young people heeded the country's call to duty, but the media do little more than pander to them as "returning heroes," rather than honor their service by demanding to know why anybody thought it was necessary. What was that all about anyway? Shouldn't we ask? The media got plenty of criticism for swallowing the lies and stoking the fires of war beforehand. But what about now? Are there no lessons to be learned? This isn't the first U.S. war shoved under the carpet. President Ford inaugurated the modern policy of "never mind" after Saigon fell in April 1975 when he declared: "This action closes a chapter in the American experience. I ask all Americans to close ranks, to avoid recrimination about the past ..." Ford's approach became a classic of U.S. official spin. It holds, first, that even if the harrowing cost of a policy blunder falls overwhelmingly on other people, it's still an "American" experience. And second, Ford warned, no "recrimination." That admonition defies a fundamental tenet of democratic systems - the indispensability of holding leaders accountable. Policy failure should be examined carefully, and responsibility assigned accordingly. That doesn't prohibit forgiveness, but it insists that mistakes be understood so they aren't repeated. We're seeing none of that. The political elite won't touch this war. Nobody's pushing them to (not even the street protesters), and they have nothing to gain. The Republicans don't want to remind anybody about Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld. The Democrats fear that anything they do would be attacked as a partisan stunt, and that their own complicity in the debacle would be exposed. The only public institution that could initiate the kind of broad-gauged examination that a disaster of this magnitude demands is the media. From the strategic folly, to the use of torture, the destruction of civilian life, the profiteering, the political miscalculation - the years of ineptitude need to be exposed and explained, and those responsible made to answer. If the media's core civic duty is to serve as a check on power, surely no abuse of power calls forth that duty more urgently than the needless infliction of war. Copyright 2012 . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Edward Wasserman is Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University. He wrote this column for The Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/01/05/2898696/media-awol-in-exposing-ineptitude.html#storylink=cpy
The U.S. war in Iraq ended just before Christmas, and if you blinked you probably missed it. TV news coaxed some seasonal sentiment out of the troops getting home for the holidays, but the Sunday-morning talk shows - where news of consequence is usually autopsied - barely noticed. The Beltway sages had weightier matters to discuss, such as the Gingrich ascendancy and the latest congressional standoff. The silence was understandable because the topic is so awkward. The Iraq war wasn't a defeat, like Vietnam. But it wasn't a win either: Saddam Hussein is long gone, but the strategic menace the invasion was meant to thwart was bogus, the installation of democracy seems shaky at best and the country seems on the verge of tearing itself apart again. Besides, the Iraq victory lap was used up back in 2003 when George W. Bush, in a supreme moment of presidential buffoonery, pranced across a carrier deck in flight regalia to declare peace just as a calamitous civil war was starting. So while the news media might like to imply that the war concluded successfully, that's a hard case to make, especially with our Iraqi friends referring to it as a "foreign occupation." And faced with a perplexing moment of historical ambiguity, the media did what they do whenever a clean story line eludes them - change the subject. Our country isn't unique in making war needlessly, but we may be in our insouciance. Attention really should be paid. Between 105,000 and 130,000 Iraqi civilians died violently, and half a million more were lost to degraded infrastructure, lousy health care and other miseries caused by years of murderous strife uncorked by the U.S. invasion. Some two million Iraqis are now refugees, and hundreds of thousands of ordinary lives have been mutilated. You'd think some sort of examination is in order: Congressional hearings? A truth and reconciliation commission? At least, an extended segment on 60 Minutes? The events of 9/11 triggered hearings, commissions, reports, reappraisals, soul-searching, reorganizations, sweeping legislation. But the immeasurably greater catastrophe of the Iraq war has brought no comparable reckoning. Forget apologies. The United States doesn't do apologies. The closest our media have come to voicing regret is lamenting the war's trillion-dollar cost and the torments of our own combatants, the 4,500 military personnel killed and many thousands maimed physically or psychologically. It's estimated that of the 2.8 million who have served since 2001, some 30 percent will live with physical or psychological disability. These young people heeded the country's call to duty, but the media do little more than pander to them as "returning heroes," rather than honor their service by demanding to know why anybody thought it was necessary. What was that all about anyway? Shouldn't we ask? The media got plenty of criticism for swallowing the lies and stoking the fires of war beforehand. But what about now? Are there no lessons to be learned? This isn't the first U.S. war shoved under the carpet. President Ford inaugurated the modern policy of "never mind" after Saigon fell in April 1975 when he declared: "This action closes a chapter in the American experience. I ask all Americans to close ranks, to avoid recrimination about the past ..." Ford's approach became a classic of U.S. official spin. It holds, first, that even if the harrowing cost of a policy blunder falls overwhelmingly on other people, it's still an "American" experience. And second, Ford warned, no "recrimination." That admonition defies a fundamental tenet of democratic systems - the indispensability of holding leaders accountable. Policy failure should be examined carefully, and responsibility assigned accordingly. That doesn't prohibit forgiveness, but it insists that mistakes be understood so they aren't repeated. We're seeing none of that. The political elite won't touch this war. Nobody's pushing them to (not even the street protesters), and they have nothing to gain. The Republicans don't want to remind anybody about Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld. The Democrats fear that anything they do would be attacked as a partisan stunt, and that their own complicity in the debacle would be exposed. The only public institution that could initiate the kind of broad-gauged examination that a disaster of this magnitude demands is the media. From the strategic folly, to the use of torture, the destruction of civilian life, the profiteering, the political miscalculation - the years of ineptitude need to be exposed and explained, and those responsible made to answer. If the media's core civic duty is to serve as a check on power, surely no abuse of power calls forth that duty more urgently than the needless infliction of war. Copyright 2012 . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Edward Wasserman is Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University. He wrote this column for The Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/01/05/2898696/media-awol-in-exposing-ineptitude.html#storylink=cpy

Iraq. Began with big lies. Ending with big lies. Never forget.


The real truth is beginning to leak out; Obama administration, Pentagon, DOD in panic mode; most Americans WANT to be deluded on illegal wars, dead soldiers, Marines

The Anti-Empire Report
By William Blum01/04/2012

"Most people don't understand what they have been part of here," said Command Sgt. Major Ron Kelley as he and other American troops prepared to leave Iraq in mid-December. "We have done a great thing as a nation. We freed a people and gave their country back to them."
"It is pretty exciting," said another young American soldier in Iraq. "We are going down in the history books, you might say." (Washington Post, December 18, 2011)


Ah yes, the history books, the multi-volume leather-bound set of "The Greatest Destructions of One Country by Another." The newest volume can relate, with numerous graphic photos, how the modern, educated, advanced nation of Iraq was reduced to a quasi failed state; how the Americans, beginning in 1991, bombed for 12 years, with one dubious excuse or another; then invaded, then occupied, overthrew the government, tortured without inhibition, killed wantonly, ... how the people of that unhappy land lost everything — their homes, their schools, their electricity, their clean water, their environment, their neighborhoods, their mosques, their archaeology, their jobs, their careers, their professionals, their state-run enterprises, their physical health, their mental health, their health care, their welfare state, their women's rights, their religious tolerance, their safety, their security, their children, their parents, their past, their present, their future, their lives ... More than half the population either dead, wounded, traumatized, in prison, internally displaced, or in foreign exile ... The air, soil, water, blood, and genes drenched with depleted uranium ... the most awful birth defects ... unexploded cluster bombs lying anywhere in wait for children to pick them up ... a river of blood running alongside the Euphrates and Tigris ... through a country that may never be put back together again.
"It is a common refrain among war-weary Iraqis that things were better before the U.S.-led invasion in 2003," reported the Washington Post on May 5, 2007.
 No matter ... drum roll, please ... Stand tall American GI hero! And don't even think of ever apologizing or paying any reparations. Iraq is forced by Washington to continue paying reparations to Kuwait for Iraq's invasion in 1990 (an invasion instigated in no small measure by the United States). And — deep breath here! — Vietnam has been compensating the United States. Since 1997 Hanoi has been paying off about $145 million in debts left by the defeated South Vietnamese government for American food and infrastructure aid. Thus, Hanoi is reimbursing the United States for part of the cost of the war waged against it. (William Blum, Rogue State, p.304) How much will the United States pay the people of Iraq?

On December 14, at the Fort Bragg, North Carolina military base, Barack Obama stood before an audience of soldiers to speak about the Iraq war. It was a moment in which the president of the United States found it within his heart and soul — as well as within his oft-praised (supposed) intellect — to proclaim:

Dead Iraqi girl
"This is an extraordinary achievement, nearly nine years in the making. And today, we remember everything that you did to make it possible...

Years from now, your legacy will endure. In the names of your fallen comrades etched on headstones at Arlington, and the quiet memorials across our country. In the whispered words of admiration as you march in parades, and in the freedom of our children and grandchildren. ... So God bless you all, God bless your families, and God bless the United States of America. ... You have earned your place in history because you sacrificed so much for people you have never met."

Does Mr. Obama, the Peace Laureate, believe the words that come out of his mouth?

Barack H. Obama believes only in being the President of the United States. It is the only strong belief the man holds.

Items of interest from a journal I've kept for 40 years, part VI

  • If the US really believed in 2002-3 that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction why did they send in more than 100,000 troops, who were certain to be annihilated?
  • In a letter released August 17, 2006, 21 former generals and high ranking national security officials called on President George W. Bush to reverse course and embrace a new area of negotiation with Iran, Iraq, and North Korea. The group told reporters Bush's "hard line" policies had undermined national security and made America less safe.
  • Throughout most of the 20th century, the Catholic Church in Latin America taught its flocks of the poor that there was no need to do battle with the ruling elite because the poor would get their just rewards in the afterlife.
  • The US overthrew the Sandinistas in Nicaragua because the Sandinistas "intended to create a country where there was only a colony before." — Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayan writer
  • "[George W.] Bush said last week that part of the purpose of the Indonesia trip 'is to make sure that the people who are suspicious of our country understand our motives are pure'." (Washington Post, October 22, 2003)
  • "Wars may be aberrant experiences in the lives of most human individuals, but some nations are serial aggressors. American society is unique in having been formed almost wholly by processes of aggression against external and internal Others." — The Black Commentator, June 8, 2006
  • President Obama should accompany the military people when they inform parents that their child has died in the latest of America's never-ending wars. And maybe ask George W. to come along as well.
  • During the Vietnam War some University of Michigan students created a brouhaha when they threatened to napalm a puppy dog on the steps of a campus building. The uproar of indignation at their cruelty was heard nationwide. Of course, when the time came they didn't do it, having successfully made the point that people cared more about napalming a dog than they did about napalming people.
  • "It's a lie and an illusion that we have an inefficient government. This government is only inefficient if you think its job is, as stated in the Constitution, 'to form a more perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.' These objectives are beyond our government's talents only because they are beyond its intentions." — Michael Ventura
  • "Get some new lawyers" - US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook when he told her he was informed that the NATO bombing of Yugoslavia in 1999 (which Albright championed) was illegal under international law.
  • The two countries of the world, along with the United States, which have the greatest national obsession with baseball are two of the main targets of US foreign policy: Venezuela and Cuba.
  • The Cuban Five case: This is the first case in American history of alleged spying and espionage without a single page from a secret document. The government never presented any evidence of a stolen official document or any attempt to steal an official document. This is the first spy case without secrets from the government. (Read more)
  • "If a bomb is deliberately dropped on a house or a vehicle on the grounds that a 'suspected terrorist' is inside, the resulting deaths of women and children may not be intentional. But neither are they accidental. The proper description is 'inevitable'. So if an action will inevitably kill innocent people, it is as immoral as a deliberate attack on civilians." — Howard Zinn
  • "The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to impose limited sanctions on North Korea for its recent missile tests, and demanded that the reclusive communist nation suspend its ballistic missile program." (Associated Press, July 15, 2006) ... Internet commentator: "Test some missiles that land harmlessly in the ocean? Unanimous condemnation. Fire some missiles at targets on land, kill hundreds of people, and destroy hundreds of civilian targets including power plants, airports, roads, bridges, TV stations, etc., all in violation of the Geneva Convention? Hey, no problem."
  • For some nine years, American B-52 bombers relentlessly dropped tons of ordnance on a southeast Asian country (Vietnam) that still cultivated rice fields using draft animals.
  • "The messianism of American foreign policy is a remarkable thing. When Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice speaks it seems like Khrushchev reporting to the party congress: 'The whole world is marching triumphantly toward democracy but some rogue states prefer to stay aside from that road, etc. etc'." — Natalia Narochnitskaya, vice chairman of the international affairs committee in the State Duma, the lower house of Russia's parliament. (Washington Post, April 3, 2006)
  • Washington ... Propagandistan
  • The bulldozer, driven by an Israeli army soldier on assignment to demolish a home, rolled over Rachel Corrie, who was 23 years old. She had taken a nonviolent position for human rights; she lost her life as a result. But she was rarely praised in the same US media outlets that had gone into raptures over the image of a solitary unarmed man standing in front of Chinese tanks at the time of the Tiananmen Square massacre. — Norman Solomon
  • American sovereignty hasn't faced a legitimate foreign threat to its existence since the British in 1812.
  • There are two major patterns in foreign policy: the rule of force or the rule of law. On February 8, 1819 the US decided, after a very long debate in the House, to reject the rule of law in foreign policy. The vote was 100 to 70 against requiring the Congress to approve illegal invasions of other countries or peoples. This pertained to the "Seminole War", actually the invasion of Florida. Since then every president has had the right to "defend America", code words for the use of force against whomever he chooses. — Kelly Gelgering

Happy New Year. Here's what to look forward to.

JANUARY 22: Congress passes a law requiring that all persons arrested in anti-war demonstrations be sterilized. House Speaker John Boehner declares it is "God's will". House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says she supports the law but that she has some reservation because there's no provision for a right of appeal.

FEBRUARY 15: Ron Paul assassinated by man named Oswald Harvey.

FEBRUARY 18: Oswald Harvey, while in solitary confinement and guarded round the clock by 1200 policemen and the entire 3rd Army Brigade, is killed by man named Ruby Jackson.

FEBRUARY 26: Ruby Jackson suddenly dies in prison of a rare Asian disease heretofore unknown in the Western Hemisphere.

MARCH 6: US President Hopey Changey announces new draconian sanctions against Iran, Syria, North Korea, Pakistan, Nicaragua, Venezuela, and Cuba, declaring that they all possess weapons of mass destruction, are an imminent threat to the United States, have close ties to al Qaeda and the Taliban, are aiding Islamic terrorists in Somalia, were involved in 9-11, played a role in the assassination of John F. Kennedy and the attack on Pearl Harbor, do not believe in God or American Exceptionalism, and are all "really bad guys".

APRIL 1: Military forces overthrow Evo Morales in Bolivia. US State Department decries the loss of democracy.

APRIL 2: US recognizes the new Bolivian military junta, sells it 100 jet fighters and 200 tanks.

APRIL 3: Revolution breaks out in Bolivia endangering the military junta; 40,000 American marines are sent to La Paz to quell the uprising.

APRIL 8: Dick Cheney announces from his hospital bed that the United States has finally discovered caches of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq — "So all those doubters can now just go 'F' themselves." The former vice-president, however, refuses to provide any details of the find because, he says, to do so might reveal intelligence sources or methods.

APRIL 10: ExxonMobil, ChevronTexaco, General Electric, General Motors, AT&T, Ford, and IBM merge to form "Free Enterprise, Inc."

APRIL 16: Free Enterprise, Inc. seeks to purchase Guatemala and Haiti. Citigroup refuses to sell.

APRIL 18: Free Enterprise, Inc. purchases Citigroup.

MAY 5: The Democratic Party changes its name to the Republican Lite Party, and announces the opening of a joint bank account with the Republicans so that corporate lobbyists need make out only one check. In celebration of the change the new party calls for eliminating the sales tax on yachts.

MAY 11: China claims to have shot down an American spy plane over the center of China. State Department categorically denies the story.

MAY 12: State Department admits that an American plane may have "inadvertently" strayed 2,000 miles into China, but denies that it was a spy plane.

MAY 13: State Department admits that the plane may have been a spy plane but denies that it was piloted by a US government employee.

MAY 14: State Department admits that the pilot was a civilian employee of a Defense Department contractor but denies that China exists.

JUNE 11: Homeland Security announces plan to collect the DNA at birth of every child born in the United States.

JULY 1: The air in Los Angeles reaches so bad a pollution level that the rich begin to hire undocumented workers to breathe for them.

AUGUST 6: The Justice Department announces that six people have been arrested in New York in connection with a plan to bomb the United Nations, the Empire State Building, the Times Square subway station, Madison Square Garden, and Lincoln Center.

AUGUST 7: Charges are dropped against four of "The New York Six" when it is determined that they are FBI agents.

AUGUST 16: At a major demonstration in Washington, the Tea Party demands an end to all government expenditures. They also warn Congress not to touch Social Security or Medicare.

AUGUST 26: Texas executes a 16-year-old girl for having an abortion and a 12-year-old boy for possession of marijuana.

SEPTEMBER 3: The Labor Department announces that Labor Day will become a celebration of America's gratitude to its corporations, a day dedicated to the memory of J.P. Morgan and Pinkerton strike breakers killed in the line of duty.

SEPTEMBER 12: The draft is reinstated for males and females, ages 16 to 45. Those who are missing a limb or are blind can apply for non-combat roles.

SEPTEMBER 14: Riots breaks out in 24 American cities in protest of the new draft. 200,000 American troops are brought home from Afghanistan, Iraq, and 25 other countries to put down the riots.

SEPTEMBER 28: The Tea Party calls for giving embryos the vote.

OCTOBER 19: Cops the world over form a new association, Policemen's International Governing Society. PIGS announces that its first goal will be to mount a campaign against the notion that a person is innocent until proven guilty, in those countries where the quaint notion still dwells.

NOVEMBER 8: The turnout for the US presidential election is 9.6%. The voting ballots are all imprinted: "From one person, one vote, to one dollar, one vote." The winner is "None of the above".

NOVEMBER 11: US prison population reaches 2.5 million. It is determined that at least 70 percent of the prisoners would not have been incarcerated a century ago, for the acts they committed were then not criminal violations.

DECEMBER 3: Supreme Court rules that police may search anyone if they have reasonable grounds for believing that the person has pockets.

DECEMBER 16: The Occupy Movement sets up a tent on the White House lawn. An hour later a missile fired from a drone leaves but a thin wisp of smoke.

William Blum
is the author of: Killing Hope: US Military and CIA Interventions Since World War 2, Rogue State: A Guide to the World's Only Superpower, West-Bloc Dissident: A Cold War Memoir, Freeing the World to Death: Essays on the American Empire. Portions of the books can be read, and signed copies purchased, at www.killinghope.org  Previous Anti-Empire Reports can be read at www.killinghope.org

Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.



THE WAR ON IRAN: The Deployment of Thousands of US Troops to Israel, The Integration of US-Israeli Command Structures

The U.S. Killed In Action house of cards is about to collapse, real numbers revealed will bring calls for Obama's impeachment

Global Research
01/05/2011

The Islamic Republic of Iran has been threatened with military action by the US and its allies for the last eight years.

Iran has been involved in war games in the Persian Gulf.
  The US Navy is deployed. Iran's naval exercises which commenced on December 24th were conducted in an area which is patrolled by the US Fifth Fleet, based in Bahrain.

Meanwhile, a new round of economic sanctions against the Islamic Republic of Iran has been unleashed, largely targeting Iran's Central Bank, leading to a dramatic plunge of Iran's currency.
Reacting to US threats, Iran declared that it would consider blocking the shipment of oil through the Strait of Hormuz:
 "Roughly 40 percent of the world's oil tanker shipments transit the strait daily, carrying 15.5 million barrels of Saudi, Iraqi, Iranian, Kuwaiti, Bahraini, Qatari and United Arab Emirates crude oil, leading the United States Energy Information Administration to label the Strait of Hormuz "the world's most important oil chokepoint." (John C.K. Daly, War Imminent in Strait of Hormuz? $200 a Barrel Oil? Global Research, January 3, 2012)
The Globalization of War and the Demise of the American Republic

There is a symbiotic relationship between War and the Economic Crisis.

The planning of the Iran war is being carried out at the crossroads of a worldwide economic depression, which is conducive to widening social inequalities, mass unemployment and the impoverishment of large sectors of the world population.

Crushing social movements on the domestic front --including all forms of resistance to America's military agenda and its neoliberal economic policies-- is an integral part of the United States' hegemonic role Worldwide.

Does Constitutional Government in the eyes of the Obama Administration constitute an encroachment to "The Globalization of War"?

History tells us that an Empire cannot be built on the political foundations of a Republic.

In this regard, it should come as no surprise that the new Iran sanctions regime adopted by the US Congress became law on New Year's Eve, December 31st, on the same day Obama signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA 2012), which suspends civil liberties and allows for the "Indefinite Detention of Americans". (See Michel Chossudovsky, The Inauguration of Police State USA 2012. Obama Signs the “National Defense Authorization Act ", Global Research, January 1, 2012)

The Obama administration is intent upon crushing both social dissent as well as antiwar protest. The American Republic is incompatible with America's "long war". What is required is the instatement of a "democratic dictatorship", a de facto military rule in civilian cloths.

Thousands of Troops to Israel

Advanced war preparations are ongoing. Barely mentioned by the Western media, although confirmed by Israeli press reports, the Pentagon is preparing to send several thousand US troops to Israel.

In the context of ongoing war preparations, these troops are slated to participate in joint US-Israeli military maneuvers in Spring 2012, described by the Jerusalem Post as "the largest-ever missile defense exercise in [Israel's] history." (emphasis added)

Obama gives money to Netanyahu while Americans
starve
Last week [11-18 December], Lt.-Gen. Frank Gorenc, commander of the US’s Third Air Force based in Germany, visited Israel to finalize plans for the upcoming drill, expected to see the deployment of several thousand American soldiers in Israel. (US commander visits Israel to finalize missile... Jerusalem Post December 21, 2011 emphasis added)

These war games involve the testing of Israel's air defense system, which is now fully integrated into the US global missile detection system, following the installation (December 2008) of a new sophisticated X-band early warning radar system. (See www.defense.gov/news/, December 30, 2011, .See also Sen. Joseph Azzolina, Protecting Israel from Iran's missiles, Bayshore News, December 26, 2008).

The US global missile detection system includes satellites, Aegis ships in the Mediterranean, Persian Gulf and Red Sea as well as land-based Patriot radars and interceptors. In the context of planning the US-Israel Spring war games:

"The US will also bring its THAAD (Terminal High Altitude Area Defense) and shipbased Aegis ballistic missile defense systems to Israel to simulate the interception of missile salvos against Israel.

Americans may expect much more of this
courtesy Israel
 The American systems will work in conjunction with Israel’s missile defense systems – the Arrow, Patriot and Iron Dome.

Gorenc came to Israel for talks with Brig.-Gen. Doron Gavish, commander of the Air Force’s Air Defense Division.

He toured one of the Iron Dome batteries in the South and the Israel Test Bed lab in Holon where the IAF holds its interception simulation exercises.

The IAF is planning to deploy a fourth battery of the Iron Dome counter-rocket system in the coming months and is mulling the possibility of stationing it in Haifa to protect oil refineries located there.

The Defense Ministry has allocated a budget to manufacture an additional three Iron Dome batteries by the end of 2012. IAF operational requirements call for the deployment of about a dozen batteries along Israel’s northern and southern borders.

The IAF is also moving forward with plans to deploy Rafael’s David’s Sling missile defense system, which is designed to defend against medium-range rockets and cruise missiles. Rafael recently completed a series of successful navigation and flight tests of the David’s Sling’s interceptor and plans to hold the first interception test by mid-2012. US commander visits Israel to finalize missile... Jerusalem Post December 21, 2011)

Integrated US-NATO-Israel Command Structures

Pursuant to these joint US-Israel games, there are indications that the US is also planning to increase the number of American troops stationed in Israel.

Moreover, these military exercises planned for next Spring are accompanied by a fundamental shift in US-NATO-Israel command structures.

What is now unfolding at Washington's behest is an integration of US-Israel military command structures.

Washington is not a reluctant partner, as some observers have suggested, "with the Obama administration attempting to distance itself" from an Israeli sponsored war on Iran. Quite the opposite!

Given the integration of Israel's air defense system into that of the US, Israel cannot, under any circumstances, wage a war on Iran without the US. Moreover, since mid-2005, following the signing of a protacol between NATO and Tel Aviv, Israel has beocme a de facto member of the Atlantic Alliance.

The Pentagon calls the shots. The planned deployment of US troops in Israel is part and parcel of a US sponsored war.

In the context of the Spring 2012 military drills, the United States military will establish Command Posts in Israel. In turn, Israel's IDF will establish Command Posts at United States European Command headquarters (EUCOM), in Stuttgart, Germany. (Ibid).

The ultimate objective of these command posts is to establish "joint [US-Israeli] task forces in the event of a large-scale conflict in the Middle East", (Ibid). In other words, these task forces will be involved in planning the deployment of troops and weapons systems directed against Iran, with Israel playing an important role as a launchpad for military action.

What these developments suggest is that the war on Iran --which has been on the drawing board of the Pentagon since 2003-- will involve the direct participation of Israel under a unified US military command.

The people of Israel are the unspoken victims of America's global military agenda as well their own government's war plans directed against Iran.

They are led to believe that Iran possesses nuclear weapons when in fact Israel possesses an advanced nuclear arsenal, which is directed against Iran.

The people of Israel as well as Western public opinion, more generally, are also led to believe that Iran's president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad wants "to Wipe Israel off the Map", when in fact this statement was concocted by the Western media, as a means of demonizing the Iranian head of state as well as presenting Iran as a threat to the security of Israel:

"Across the world, a dangerous rumor has spread that could have catastrophic implications. According to legend, Iran's President has threatened to destroy Israel, or, to quote the misquote, "Israel must be wiped off the map". Contrary to popular belief, this statement was never made"


Who wants to "wipe Israel off the Map"? Tehran or Washington? Ahmadinejad or Obama?

In actual fact, the Obama administration as well as the Netanyahu government indelibly constitute a threat to the people of Israel.

Tehran has since 2005 warned that it will retaliate if attacked, in the form of ballistic missile strikes directed against Israel as well as against US military facilities in the Persian Gulf, which would immediately lead us into a scenario of military escalation.

This war would engulf a region extending from the Mediterranean to the heartland of Central Asia. It would have devastating consequences, resulting in a massive loss of life.

It would precipitate humanity into a World War III scenario.


Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The 5th Estate.

Images:  Google royalty free unless otherwise attributed.


This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc.  We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.


US military deaths in Afghanistan at 1,741; Obama, JCS continue to lie about real number of combat deaths


Quadruple that ridiculous number and it may be closer to truth; DOD does not count as KIA casualties that have died in hospitals after leaving Afghanistan and Iraq; civilians killed are not counted; U.S. now taking casualties in Bahrain - goes unreported by MSM

Nation Wires
01/05/2011
The Associated Press As of Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, at least 1,741 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.The AP count is four less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.At least 1,464 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers. Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 104 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department's tally.The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 15,157 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.---The latest identifications reported by the military:-Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.-Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.-Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.---Online:http://www.defense.gov/news/

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/03/2571820/us-military-deaths-in-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy
The Associated Press As of Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, at least 1,741 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.The AP count is four less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.At least 1,464 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers. Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 104 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department's tally.The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 15,157 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.---The latest identifications reported by the military:-Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.-Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.-Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.---Online:http://www.defense.gov/news/

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/03/2571820/us-military-deaths-in-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy
 Associated Press As of Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, at least 1,741 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.The AP count is four less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.At least 1,464 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers. Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 104 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department's tally.The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 15,157 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.---The latest identifications reported by the military:-Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.-Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.-Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.---Online:http://www.defense.gov/news/

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/03/2571820/us-military-deaths-in-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy
The Associated Press As of Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, at least 1,741 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.The AP count is four less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.At least 1,464 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers. Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 104 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department's tally.The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 15,157 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.---The latest identifications reported by the military:-Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.-Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.-Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.---Online:http://www.defense.gov/news/

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/03/2571820/us-military-deaths-in-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy
As of Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, at least 1,741 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.The AP count is four less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.At least 1,464 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers. Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 104 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department's tally.The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 15,157 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.---The latest identifications reported by the military:-Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.-Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.-Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.---

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/03/2571820/us-military-deaths-in-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy
The latest identifications reported by the military:-Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.-Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.-Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/03/2571820/us-military-deaths-in-afghanistan.html#storylink=cpy

As of Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, at least 1,741 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

     The AP count is four less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.

U.S. military, Obama don't count civilian dead
in illegal war
At least 1,464 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 104 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.

   The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department's tally.

    The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

    Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 15,157 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.

———

     The latest identifications reported by the military:

U.S. now taking casualties in Bahrain and goes
unreported by MSM
—Spc. Pernell J. Herrera, 33, of Espanola, N.M., died Dec. 31, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered in a non-combat incident; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 171st Aviation Regiment, Santa Fe, N.M.

—Three soldiers died Dec. 27, in Paktia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Killed were Sgt. Noah M. Korte, 29, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., Spc. Kurt W. Kern, 24, of McAllen, Texas, and Pfc. Justin M. Whitmire, 20, of Easley, S.C.

—Petty Officer Stacy O. Johnson, 35, of Rolling Fork, Miss., died July 18, while supporting operations in Bahrain. Johnson was a master-at-arms assigned to Naval Security Force Bahrain.

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5th Estate Exclusive : Akiko Makino, H5N1 Virus Thief; More "Smoking Gun" E-Mails From Kobe University Virologist Teridah Ernala Ginting


Kobe University virologist Kawaoka attempts to steal H5N1 virus samples from Indonesia, caught at airport

The 5th Estate
By Robert S. Finnegan
01/05/2012

Saturday, 27 June, 2009 09:56
From:
To:
"Southeast Asia News" <seanews1@yahoo.com>
Hi Robert,

Thank you for the article. 
It seems the scientist couldn't find any prove that the swine flu virus derived from animal. They couldn't find any animal having this virus.

It's interesting isn't it? Where did it come from then?

Ida

 

Analysis

Friday, 3 July, 2009 16:08
From:
To:
"Southeast Asia News" <seanews1@yahoo.com>
Hey Robert,

Do you know anything about GSK (Glaxo-Smith Kline), a pharmaceutical industry.
They won a tender to produce hundreds millions of swine flu vaccine for Europe countries. Now they're going to occupy the drugs market too..
They're the richest company now I think.

Ida


PS: you better read the mail from the bottom. You will see how they're desperately want samples.

For your information:

Yoshi sensei - Yoshihiro Kawaoka, my professor. The authority. Everything done by these following two names are for his sake.

Shinya - Kyoko Shinya, my associate professor also my boss in this project. She's always using me and telling lot of lies.

Makino - Akiko Makino, new assistant professor from Tokyo Univ. She carried the illegal samples from Indonesia.

Yamaoka - Masaoki Yamaoka, a Japanese researcher assigned in Indonesia.

Dr Hatta - Shinya got the human samples from dr Hatta, but claimed it as dr Nidom's samples at Surabaya airport.


Please click to enlarge

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ANDREW KREIG: EXPERTS REJECT FIRE AS CAUSE FOR 9/11 WTC COLLAPSES

The real truth on 9/11 slowly continues to bleed out

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Technical experts are mounting major challenges to official U.S. government accounts of how three World Trade Center skyscrapers collapsed in near-freefall after the 9/11 attacks 15 years ago.

Many researchers are focusing especially on the little-known collapse of

READ MORE >>

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The Geopolitics Of The United States, Part 1: The Inevitable Empire

The Empire and the inevitable fall of the Obama criminal regime

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STRATFOR Editor’s Note: This installment on the United States, presented in two parts, is the 16th in a series of STRATFOR monographs on the geopolitics of countries influential in world affairs.

Like nearly all of the peoples of North and South America, most Americans are not originally from the territory that became the United States.

READ MORE >>

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Geopolitics Of The United States Part 2: American Identity And The Threats of Tomorrow

A look back at 2011 predictions for the future in order to put events of today into perspective

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We have already discussed in the first part of this analysis how the American geography dooms whoever controls the territory to being a global power, but there are a number of other outcomes that shape what that power will be like. The first and most critical is the impact of that geography on the American mindset.

READ MORE >>

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By Robert S. Finnegan

This e-mail outlines and confirms the acts of espionage against Indonesia and Indonesians by Akiko Makino and the others involved both in Kobe University and in AI Lab at University of Airlangga, Surabaya; Bahasa Indonesia original follows English translation...

READ MORE >>

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UPDATED 01/07/2015 : New Analysis Challenges Tamiflu Efficacy; Hong Kong Corona Virus Outbreak

UPDATED 01/07/2015 : FOX NEWS CORPORATE PHARMA SHILL MEGAN KELLY AND FOX NEWS QUACK DOCTOR NOW PUSHING TAMIFLU FOR PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN;

 photo TAMIFLU_small_zpssojx6okt.jpg
THE 5TH ESTATE UNEQUIVOCALLY WARNS THE PUBLIC NOT TO TAKE OR GIVE THIS PROVEN DANGEROUS, INEFFECTIVE DRUG TO ANYONE

Obama criminals now resulting to biowarfare in quest to destroy Chinese and ASEAN economy; "novel virus substrain" points directly to a Kawaoka / Fouchier / Ernala-Ginting Kobe lab virus weaponized and genetically altered to specifically target and infect the Asian population: Ribavirin...

READ MORE >>

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 photo WHO02_zpsplmhtlpr.jpg
The 5th Estate has just purchased a library on H5N1 "Novel" virus pandemics, there are dozens of PDF and Exel documents we feel will assist you in saving lives following intentional releases of the H5N1 and now MERS viruses; we will begin by printing those that appear to be extremely relevant here: H5N1 Kobe-Kawaoka-Ernala series continues soon with more "Smoking Gun" e-mails from Teridah Ernala to The 5th Estate . . .

READ MORE >>

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By Robert S. Finnegan

On October 12, 2002 the Indonesian island of Bali experienced a terrorist attack that rocked the world. It was unquestionably well-coordinated and executed, the largest in the country's history.

READ MORE >>